Contact Us For A Demo

Posts Tagged ‘smoke alarms’

FEMA Adds New Features to Natural Disaster App

Tuesday, April 19th, 2016

Mobile App Development, Experienced Team. Flat 3d isometricPush notifications remind users to take simple steps to prepare for disasters, and provide easy access to information about safety relative to fires, severe weather and more.

Earlier this month, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) added a noteworthy new feature to its free smartphone app, which pushes notifications to users’ devices to remind them to take important steps to prepare their homes and families for disasters.

The app reminds users about:

  • Pre-scheduled safety and preparedness tips
  • Routine smoke alarm testing
  • Fire escape plan drills
  • Emergency kit updates
  • Smoke alarm battery replacement

Escape plan

“In just two minutes, a home fire can become life-threatening,” said U.S. Fire Administrator Ernest Mitchell Jr. “Remembering to take small steps to prepare, such as ensuring your smoke alarm is properly maintained and practicing your home fire escape plan, will reduce fire fatalities and ensure our communities are safer. We hope this new feature to FEMA’s app will help save lives by encouraging more families to be prepared.”

At the Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services, we are committed to pointing our subscribers to helpful disaster preparedness information from a variety of reputable sources, including FEMA. What’s more, we have recently tweaked our own offerings, so our subscribers can e-train at their convenience, on desktop computer, laptop  or iPad.

For their part, FEMA officials tout their new app reminder feature, saying it provides a customizable checklist of emergency supplies, maps of open shelters and open recovery centers, and offers tips for surviving natural and man-made disasters. The FEMA app also incorporates push notifications of weather alerts from the National Weather Service. Through the feature, users can stay on top of weather patterns for up to five national locations.

Other key features of the app:

  • weather word cloudWeather Alerts: Users can elect to receive alerts on severe weather happenings in specific areas, so users can follow potential weather-related threats to family and friends.
  • Safety Tips: Includes tips on how to stay safe before, during, and after more than 20 types of hazards, including floods, hurricanes, tornadoes and earthquakes.
  • Disaster Reporter: Users can upload and share disaster-related photos.
  • Maps of Disaster Resources: Users can locate and receive driving directions for open shelters and disaster recovery centers.
    Help with Taxes
  • Apply for Assistance: The app provides easy access to federal disaster assistance applications.
  • Information in Spanish: The app defaults to Spanish-language content for smartphones set to Spanish as the default language.

The latest version of the FEMA app is available for free in the App Store for Apple devices and Google Play for Android devices. Users who already have the app downloaded on their device should download the latest update for the reminder alerts feature to take effect. The reminders are available in English and Spanish. To learn more, visit: The FEMA App: Helping Your Family Weather the Storm.

Remember that safety is a daily priority. So be sure to think about ways to #BeSafe all of the time. A convenient and affordable way to make sure you are prepared for disasters and emergencies of virtually every kind is to subscribe to the Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services, which has been designed to help improve and save lives. For more information about the best system out there, or to subscribe, click here.

National Fire Prevention Week

Sunday, October 5th, 2014

Fire Prevention 2014 corpThe National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) announced that the week of October 5-11, 2014 is Fire Prevention Week. The theme of the week-long fire prevention campaign, which is the 90th annual event of its kind, is “Working Smoke Alarms Save Lives: Test Yours Every Month!”

“Smoke alarms can help make the difference between life and death in a fire, but they need to be working,” said Lorraine Carli, NFPA’s vice president of Outreach and Advocacy. “This year’s Fire Prevention Week campaign reinforces the importance of testing smoke alarms each month, and works to ensure that people have the needed protection in the event of a home fire.”

Educating people about smoke alarm devices is important, since nearly two-thirds of home fire deaths reportedly result from fires in homes without operational smoke alarms.

“The common presence of smoke alarms in the home tends to create a false sense of security,” said Carli. “Simply having smoke alarms isn’t enough. They need to be tested and maintained properly.”

fire prevention 2014 calendar corpHere are ways that smoke alarms figured in United States’ fires between 2007 and 2011, which is the most recent national smoke alarm study:

  • Smoke alarms sounded in half of the home fires reported to U.S. fire departments.
  • Three of every five home fire deaths resulted from fires in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms.
  • No smoke alarms were present in more than one-third (37%) of the home fire deaths.

In addition to monthly testing, smoke alarms should be installed and maintained according to the following 10 steps:

  1. Install smoke alarms inside and outside each bedroom and sleeping area. Install alarms on every level of the home.
  2. Install alarms in the basement.
  3. If you own a large home, you may need to install extra smoke alarms.
  4. If possible, use interconnected smoke alarms. When one smoke alarm sounds, they all sound.
  5. Test smoke alarms at least once a month. Press the test button to be sure the alarm is working.
  6. Be aware that there are two kinds of alarms – Ionization smoke alarms are quicker to warn about flaming fires, and photoelectric alarms are quicker to warn about smoldering fires. If possible, use both types of alarms in the home.
  7. A smoke alarm should be on the ceiling or high on a wall.
  8. Keep smoke alarms away from the kitchen to reduce false alarms. They should be at least 10 feet (3 meters) from the stove.
  9. People who are hard-of-hearing or deaf can use special alarms. These alarms feature strobe lights and bed shakers.
  10. Replace all smoke alarms when they are 10 years old.

Fireman With HomeThe NFPA website has a wealth of additional smoke alarm information and resources for parents and teachers, and for fire departments working to implement the campaign in their communities. In addition, the NFPA  Sparky the Fire Dog® website (www.sparky.org/fpw) features award-winning apps and games for kids that reinforce the campaign’s fire safety messages. What’s more, the NFPA and its 2014 FPW partners are working together to promote the importance of monthly testing and related smoke alarm education. For more information about Fire Prevention Week and upcoming events, visit www.fpw.org.

For relevant fire prevention information relative to high rise buildings and facilities’ management, check out our recent fire prevention blog posts. We hope you will observe National Fire Prevention Week, and take steps to make sure you and your tenants or building occupants are #FireSafe. The Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services is a convenient and affordable solution to helping improve and save lives. Visit our website for ways proper planning can make a difference in numerous aspects of your professional and personal life.

Holiday Safety Tips from A-Z

Monday, November 22nd, 2010
A tangle of green and blue Christmas lights

Make sure your family, friends and staff remain safe during the holidays.

‘Tis the Season – For Safety

You know the story. Every year, beginning in mid-November, the local news starts discussing the dangers posed by Christmas trees and other holiday hazards. Let us take the opportunity to go beyond their typical tip of the day to give you an A to Z guide in order to ensure you and your family, friends and business associates are safe during the holidays.

Always remember to turn off the Christmas tree lights!

Be careful when walking to your car…especially if you are carrying holiday gifts.

Call ahead to find out how crowded streets near shopping centers are, to avoid encountering crazy drivers in holiday traffic

Drag your tree to the curb, or, better yet…check into tree recycling programs so you won’t create a dried-out fire hazard.

Extinguishers are vital to deal with fires! Make sure yours aren’t past their prime and that you are properly trained to use one.

Fire and emergency exit codes are important considerations when you host parties. So don’t invite 70 people to your studio apartment.

Get involved with Fire Prevention Week every year.

Happy Holidays from Allied Universal!

Immune Systems are taxed by too many activities. Get some rest so you will stay healthy.

Juices from uncooked foods can be contaminated. Keep a clean kitchen for happy and healthy guests.

Kitchen fires are prevalent during the holidays… the source of 40% of all house fires.

Lights on the tree should be checked for cracked wires. Also, connect no more than three strands together.

Manage holiday stress to stay healthy.

New toys should be carefully checked for safety and age-appropriateness.

Overloading electrical circuits can spark fires. Do your Christmas lights have to be visible from space?

Power lines should be avoided when hanging outdoor lights. Also, for outdoor light safety, use a fiberglass or wooded ladder.

Quit smoking for your own health and to reduce the risk of fire.

Remove lights or electrical decorations when they flicker or show other signs of wear.

Smokers should stay outside in designated areas. (See Q for another smoking-safety tip.)

Test smoke alarms.

Unplug Christmas lights when you are changing broken bulbs.

Viruses like the common cold love holiday’s parties! Consider distributing hand sanitizer as a party favor.

Windows are not the place to hang holiday decorations. Drapes and lit candles or hot light bulbs don’t mix.

Xeriscaping your yard this winter can help lower your risk for fire next summer.

Your business needs an evacuation plan, especially if you will be hosting a massive holiday party.

Zero water means a dry tree. Don’t be stingy with the H2O.

Remember, you can have fun and be safe at the same time! Follow holidays safety tips to ensure your family and coworkers have a fun and safe holiday’s season!

When a disaster strikes, prior planning and clear decisive action can help save lives.  For the latest emergency management training for facility/building managers, contact Allied Universal, Inc. Our new Version 2.0 e-based training system offers the best emergency training system with automated and integrated features. Visit rjwestmore.com for more information and remember to BE SAFE.