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Posts Tagged ‘emergency preparedness kit’

New Year’s Safety Resolutions

Tuesday, December 30th, 2014

BeeSafeHow to #BeSafe in 2015  

New Year’s Resolutions. Most people write a few down, even if they have no intention of ever following through. According to USA.Gov, the 10 most popular resolutions are to:

  • Lose weight
  • Volunteer to help others
  • Quit smoking
  • Get a better education.
  • Get a better job
  • Save money
  • Get fit
  • Eat healthier
  • Manage stress
  • Manage debt

Happy New Year 2015

As good as those aspirations are, we propose they fail to incorporate one of the most important goals anyone could make—to #BeSafe! So, as our gift to you for 2015, we have prepared a list of our suggestions for 10 New Year’s Safety Resolutions:

  1. Create/update home and workplace emergency preparedness kits. The contents of your kit will vary depending on individual needs. Set aside a three-day-per-person supply of foodwater and other essentials. Local officials and relief workers will be on the scene after a disaster but they cannot reach everyone immediately. Help could arrive in hours or it could take days for relief workers to get to you.
  2. Develop and practice an emergency preparedness plan. The Ready Campaign and Citizen Corps encourages households, businesses and communities to prepare for emergencies by making plans to be self-reliant for three days without utilities and electricity, water service, access to a supermarket or local services. If you own or manage a facility, make sure tenants and employees are well-informed of emergency procedures. Develop a plan and run periodic drills. Practice makes perfect.
  1. Don’t play with fire. When fires break out, the potential for loss is high if occupants are untrained and proper fire life safety systems are not utilized. So take precautions to make sure you are fire safe, whether you are located in an area with a high risk of wildfire; visiting, living or working inside a high rise building; or just hanging out at home.

New_Year_Resolutions_

  1. Learn CPR. Sudden cardiac arrest, the leading cause of death in adults, accounts for 325,000 annual adult deaths in the United States. Prompt, effective administration of CPR/AED and first aid can mean the difference between life and death.
  2. Take advantage of available vaccines. Because some people second-guess the wisdom of vaccinating their children, once eradicated diseases such as polio and tuberculosis are reemerging. Do your due diligence by researching booster shots your pediatrician suggests. However, refusing critical vaccinations could put the rest of the population at risk.
  3. Learn how to determine whether any given disaster would be best handled by evacuation or sheltering in place. Since every natural or man-made disaster is unique, you won’t be able to predict the best course of action. But, you can educate yourself about the various types of emergencies and how to respond most appropriately in each situation.
  1. Wash your hands often. Use soap and water or hand sanitizer to prevent spreading germs. During flu season, this is especially important! The CDC likens hand washing to a “do-it-yourself” vaccine. Effective hand washing involves five simple and effective steps, including wet, lather, scrub, rinse and dry. Regular hand washing, particularly before and after certain activities, is the best way to remove germs, avoid getting sick, and prevent the spread of germs to others.
  2. Be mindful of safety risks associated with natural disasters. Extreme heat, mudslides, flash floods, tornadoes, hurricanes and earthquakes pose significant and very specific safety-related issues. So the best way to prepare is to research the risks that pertain to your geographic location.
  1. Eat better and move more. Why are these suggestions on a list of safety tips? Because many health-related issues are brought on by lack of exercise and poor diet. So, eat right and keep moving to beef up your immune system. Doing so will help you avoid contagious bugs such as Influenza, and prevent you from developing serious health conditions like Diabetes.
  2. Be careful when you travel. This is important for several reasons:
  • Remain alert at the airport to help circumvent terrorist activity. When you fly, pay attention to suspicious activity and refuse to watch bags for anyone you don’t know.
  • Research the potential health risks associated with your destination (West Africa, relative to Ebola), and take proper precautions.
  • Don’t drink and drive!
  • Do not text while driving. Did you know that people who text while driving are 23 times more likely to get into an accident than those who resist the urge to pick up their cell phones while driving? More than 1.6 million automobile accidents that occurred last year in the U.S. were related to texting while driving (National Safety Council). Put the phone down or pull over to use it. It can wait.

We hope that this blog post will help you make safe choices in 2015 and beyond. One convenient and affordable way to do so is to subscribe to the Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services, which has been designed to help improve and save lives. Visit rjwestmore.com to read about the many ways proper planning can make a difference in numerous aspects of your professional and personal life.

How to Prepare for Falling Meteorites

Tuesday, February 19th, 2013

Injuries resulting from falling meteorites sounds like scene out of a science fiction movie. But as we all learned on February 19, 2013, truth can be stranger than fiction. According to Reuters, “Residents of Chelyabinsk, an industrial city 1,500 km (950 miles) east of Moscow, heard an explosion, saw a bright light and then felt a shockwave that blew out windows and damaged the walls and roof of a zinc plant.” At least 1,200 were injured. NASA estimates the meteor was 55 feet across before entering Earth’s atmosphere and weighed about 10,000 tons.

How much of a threat do meteorites pose? When an asteroid the size of the White House made a record close pass by earth on the same day that the meteor exploded over Russia, scientists labeled the dual event “Freaky Friday,” citing 100 million-to-1 odds. “We would expect an event of this magnitude to occur once every 100 years on average,” said Paul Chodas of NASA’s Near-Earth Object Program Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

As with any other type of emergency, the best way to respond during and recover following any asteroid-related event is to prepare. Since falling meteorites are possible, if not inevitable, we thought it worthwhile to provide you with tips to help you prepare. After all, planning for a falling asteroids isn’t much different from planning for a disaster of any kind. Just remember to Get a Kit, Make a Plan, and Be Informed:

Get a Kit

As with any emergency, the first step in preparation is to put together an emergency preparedness kit or “go bag.” Although you might want to add a hard hat to protect yourself from falling debris, most disaster kits include the same basic items, each of which should be placed into an easy-to-carry kit for use at home or to take with you if you need to evacuate:

  • Water—one gallon per person, per day (3­-day supply for evacuation, 2­-week supply for use at home.)
  • Food—non­perishable items (3-­day supply for evacuation, 2-­week supply for use at home)
  • Flashlight and extra batteries
  • Battery­-powered or hand-­crank radio (A NOAA-Weather Radio is recommended.)
  • First aid kit and medications (including OTC and prescriptions)
  • Multi­purpose tool
  • Personal hygiene items
  • Hand sanitizer
  • Copies of personal documents (medication requirements, pertinent medical information, proof of address, deed/lease to home, passports, birth certificates and insurance policies, family and emergency contact information)
  • Cell phone with chargers so you can text your friends when you find meteorite particles you want to post on ebay.
  • Map(s) of the immediate area so you know where the largest chunks of debris fell.
  • Medical supplies
  • Baby supplies (bottles, formula, baby food, diapers)
  • Games and activities for children
  • Pet supplies (collar, leash, ID, food, carrier, bowl)
  • Extra set of car keys and house keys
  • Can opener
  • Whistle to alert others if you or any of your family members or coworkers are injured
  • N95 or surgical masks in case of environmental pathogens
  • Matches
  • Rain gear and plastic sheeting to keep dry
  • Towels, which can be used for bedding, to wipe up messes and as bandages or tourniquets
  • Work gloves
  • Extra clothing, hat and sturdy shoes
  • Duct tape
  • Scissors Household bleach
  • Blankets or sleeping bags

Make a Plan

  • Make sure you have a plan for contacting family and friends if any emergency strikes.
  • Develop an evacuation plan and practice it so you will be able to move quickly.
  • Decide how you and loved ones will connect in case communication and transportation are compromised.

Be Informed

To make sure you are updated about disasters, tune to emergency radio stations and sign up for mobile-phone updates. If your television is working, watch the news.

When a disaster strikes, prior planning and clear decisive action can help save lives. The Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services helps commercial buildings with compliance to fire life safety codes. Our interactive, building-specific e-learning training system motivates and rewards tenants instantly! It’s a convenient and affordable solution to all of the training needs of your building(s). Choosing our service cuts property management training related workloads by 90% and saves you over 50% compared to conventional training! More importantly, IT SAVES LIVES!

Prepare for the Zombie Apocalypse!

Monday, July 16th, 2012

(This is a light-hearted take on a fictional event. There is actually no such thing as a Zombie Apocalypse. (Yet!)

The threat of a zombie apocalypse could be closer than you think. If zombies attack, would you be ready? As the CDC explains, if you are ready for a zombie apocalypse, you are ready for anything.

First, consider how easily a zombie apocalypse could begin:

  1. A genetically altered, infected flea from a mad scientist’s flea circus lab hyper-jumps out of its jar onto a mad scientist’s pet vampire werewolf.
  2. Doing his best coyote imitation, the werewolf comes into your neighborhood in search of food, stray cats, etc. 
  3. Your cat narrowly escapes the life or death encounter but picks up the now fast multiplying mutant vampire fleas.
  4. Scared to death, your cat screams into your house, over the kitchen counter, across the couch, up the stairs into your bedroom and under your covers–leaving a trail of hungry mutant vampire fleas everywhere.
  5. While you’re sleeping, the hungry mutant fleas spread out and find you and your family and dig in.
  6. By morning, your whole family is infected but don’t notice in your excited rush to get to the airport to go to the 2012 Olympic Games in London.
  7. What you don’t realize is that these mutant fleas don’t just bite. They eat their way under your skin and infect your bloodstream with mind-eating parasites that turn you and your whole family into Zombies while simultaneously germinating the geometrically growing millions of new mutant vampire Zombie fleas that are hungry for new hosts.
  8. To save money, you have booked connecting flights from Hawaii to California to Atlanta, to New York to London with layovers at each stop. So you are spreading fleas everywhere you go and infecting hundreds and hundreds of people in every airport who are now taking the mutant vampire Zombie flea parasites all over the world.
  9. By the time to get to London, you realize that something is not right when you can’t stop yourself from dancing like you’re an extra in the Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” video or listening to Warren Zevon’s song “Werewolves of London.” But it’s too late now– ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE!!!!!!

Since a zombie apocalypse is obviously inevitable, we thought it worthwhile to take this week’s Allied Universal Training System blog post help you prepare. After all, planning for a zombie apocalypse isn’t much different from planning for a disaster of any kind. Just remember to Get a Kit, Make a Plan, and Be Informed:

Get a Kit

As with any emergency, the first step in preparation is to put together an emergency preparedness kit or “go bag.” Although you might want to include a few extra items to ward off zombies, most disaster kits include the same basic items, each of which should be placed into an easy-to-carry kit for use at home or to take with you if you need to evacuate:

  • Water—one gallon per person, per day (3­-day supply for evacuation, 2­-week supply for use at home.) If you are bitten by a zombie, you will probably become very thirsty and be glad you have plenty of water on hand.
  • Food—non­perishable items (3-­day supply for evacuation, 2-­week supply for use at home)
  • Flashlight and extra batteries
  • Battery­-powered or hand-­crank radio (The best choice would be a NOAA Weather Radio.)
  • First aid kit and medications (including OTC and prescriptions)
  • Multi­purpose tool which you could use to cut off any zombie-bite infected limbs
  • Personal hygiene items
  • Hand sanitizer in case the zombie gets blood on you when he attacks
  • Copies of personal documents (medication requirements, pertinent medical information, proof of address, deed/lease to home, passports, birth certificates and insurance policies, family and emergency contact information)
  • Cell phone with chargers so you can text your friends about zombie movement
  • Map(s) of the immediate area so you know where to flee from zombies
  • Medical supplies to help in the treatment of zombie bites
  • Baby supplies (bottles, formula, baby food, diapers)
  • Games and activities for children
  • Pet supplies (collar, leash, ID, food, carrier, bowl)
  • Extra set of car keys and house keys
  • Can opener so you can try to bribe the zombie with food
  • Whistle to alert others in your area about zombie threats
  • N95 or surgical masks in case of environmental pathogens
  • Matches so you can light zombies on fire or start a fire to keep yourself warm
  • Rain gear and plastic sheeting to keep dry and hide from wandering zombies
  • Towels, which can be used for bedding, to wipe up messes and as bandages or tourniquets which will be needed if zombies bite
  • Work gloves so you can remove dead zombies from the area
  • Extra clothing, hat and sturdy shoes
  • Duct tape (which you can try to use to bind the zombies’ hands, feet and mouth).
  • Scissors (which will double as a helpful tool and anti-zombie weapon)
  • Household bleach (possibly good for pouring onto zombies so they melt, if they behave like the Wicked Witch of the West in The Wizard of Oz)
  • Blankets or sleeping bags to hide from the zombies
  • Extra cash to pay off the head zombie, so he and his cohorts will leave you alone

Make a Plan

  • Make sure you have a plan for contacting family and friends in the event of a zombie attack.
  • Develop an evacuation plan and practice it so you will be able to move quickly in the event of an actual zombie attack.
  • Decide before an actual zombie attack how you and loved ones will connect in case communication and transportation is compromised.

Be Informed

Zombie-related emergencies could range from severe headaches, dry eye, the heartbreak of psoriasis. Not to mention major clothing malfunctions and dirty mouth health issues. And remember Zombies can’t get affordable medical and dental care so you will be on your own. Even Obamacare won’t be able to help you.

To make sure you are updated about disasters, tune into radio stations, and sign up for mobile-phone updates. If your television is working, watch the news as well as reruns of The Walking Dead, where you will undoubtedly learn more about zombie activity than you ever cared to ask.

So what exactly is the point of the CDC’s “Zombie Apocalypse” campaign? For any type of disaster, preparation is the key. If you over-prepare for the worst case scenario (And, let’s face it; it doesn’t get worse than flesh-eating zombies), then you will be able to handle an emergency of any kind. The good news is that the CDC assures us that there is actually no basis for a real zombie apocalypse. We have provided these tips as a light-hearted way to remind you to prepare for disasters of any kind.

When a disaster strikes, prior planning and clear decisive action can help save lives.  For the latest emergency management training for facility/building managers, contact Allied Universal, Inc. Our new Version 3.0 e-based training system offers the best emergency training system.

Emergency Procedures for Those with Autism

Monday, September 7th, 2009

Autism Ribbon Bob Blog

In honor of Disaster Preparedness Month, Allied Universal, Inc. is proud to announce a new informational worksheet detailing the most effective way to deal with people who have Autism, in the event of an emergency.

The emergency preparedness instructions should help family members, friends and first responders remember the proper methods for helping Autistic people.

While a disaster can be a traumatic experience for anyone, it can be especially frightening for someone who is autistic. Autism is defined as a brain development disorder characterized by impaired social interaction and communication, and by restricted and repetitive behavior.

Those who care for people with autism, or are in close contact with an autistic person, should be made aware of the special precautions that must be taken during an emergency.

Autistic people have a tendency to hide, or become suddenly paralyzed with fear, in the event of a catastrophe. Anyone who attempts to help them can be perceived as a dangerous threat. This is why it is important for emergency responders to be able to recognize the signs and symptoms of autism, so that they can take precautionary measures.

  • During an emergency, people with autism will resort to self-soothing methods, such as rocking, or talking to themselves.
  • Autistic people have also been known to become fascinated with dangerous stimuli.
  • For example; in the event of a fire, an autistic man may stand dangerously close to the flames in order to stare at the fire.
  • In a flood, an autistic girl could potentially travel towards flowing water, instead of away from it, which could put her in immediate danger.

If more people are able to identify these types of behaviors, and offer assistance in a calm, non-threatening way, the chances of a successful rescue will be dramatically increased.

In dealing with someone who you know is, or who appears to be, autistic:

  1. Speak slowly, in basic, concrete terms. Allow time for responses.
  2. Use visual communication as much as possible.
  3. Do not attempt to physically stop self-stimulating behavior.
  4. Have Autism Emergency Contact Forms completed

Allied Universal offers disaster preparedness training for everyone, including people with autism. There has never a better time to learn how to respond during an emergency than in September, during Disaster Preparedness Month.  BE SAFE!