Contact Us For A Demo

Archive for the ‘Version 3.0’ Category

Prepare for the Zombie Apocalypse!

Monday, July 16th, 2012

(This is a light-hearted take on a fictional event. There is actually no such thing as a Zombie Apocalypse. (Yet!)

The threat of a zombie apocalypse could be closer than you think. If zombies attack, would you be ready? As the CDC explains, if you are ready for a zombie apocalypse, you are ready for anything.

First, consider how easily a zombie apocalypse could begin:

  1. A genetically altered, infected flea from a mad scientist’s flea circus lab hyper-jumps out of its jar onto a mad scientist’s pet vampire werewolf.
  2. Doing his best coyote imitation, the werewolf comes into your neighborhood in search of food, stray cats, etc. 
  3. Your cat narrowly escapes the life or death encounter but picks up the now fast multiplying mutant vampire fleas.
  4. Scared to death, your cat screams into your house, over the kitchen counter, across the couch, up the stairs into your bedroom and under your covers–leaving a trail of hungry mutant vampire fleas everywhere.
  5. While you’re sleeping, the hungry mutant fleas spread out and find you and your family and dig in.
  6. By morning, your whole family is infected but don’t notice in your excited rush to get to the airport to go to the 2012 Olympic Games in London.
  7. What you don’t realize is that these mutant fleas don’t just bite. They eat their way under your skin and infect your bloodstream with mind-eating parasites that turn you and your whole family into Zombies while simultaneously germinating the geometrically growing millions of new mutant vampire Zombie fleas that are hungry for new hosts.
  8. To save money, you have booked connecting flights from Hawaii to California to Atlanta, to New York to London with layovers at each stop. So you are spreading fleas everywhere you go and infecting hundreds and hundreds of people in every airport who are now taking the mutant vampire Zombie flea parasites all over the world.
  9. By the time to get to London, you realize that something is not right when you can’t stop yourself from dancing like you’re an extra in the Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” video or listening to Warren Zevon’s song “Werewolves of London.” But it’s too late now– ZOMBIE APOCALYPSE!!!!!!

Since a zombie apocalypse is obviously inevitable, we thought it worthwhile to take this week’s Allied Universal Training System blog post help you prepare. After all, planning for a zombie apocalypse isn’t much different from planning for a disaster of any kind. Just remember to Get a Kit, Make a Plan, and Be Informed:

Get a Kit

As with any emergency, the first step in preparation is to put together an emergency preparedness kit or “go bag.” Although you might want to include a few extra items to ward off zombies, most disaster kits include the same basic items, each of which should be placed into an easy-to-carry kit for use at home or to take with you if you need to evacuate:

  • Water—one gallon per person, per day (3­-day supply for evacuation, 2­-week supply for use at home.) If you are bitten by a zombie, you will probably become very thirsty and be glad you have plenty of water on hand.
  • Food—non­perishable items (3-­day supply for evacuation, 2-­week supply for use at home)
  • Flashlight and extra batteries
  • Battery­-powered or hand-­crank radio (The best choice would be a NOAA Weather Radio.)
  • First aid kit and medications (including OTC and prescriptions)
  • Multi­purpose tool which you could use to cut off any zombie-bite infected limbs
  • Personal hygiene items
  • Hand sanitizer in case the zombie gets blood on you when he attacks
  • Copies of personal documents (medication requirements, pertinent medical information, proof of address, deed/lease to home, passports, birth certificates and insurance policies, family and emergency contact information)
  • Cell phone with chargers so you can text your friends about zombie movement
  • Map(s) of the immediate area so you know where to flee from zombies
  • Medical supplies to help in the treatment of zombie bites
  • Baby supplies (bottles, formula, baby food, diapers)
  • Games and activities for children
  • Pet supplies (collar, leash, ID, food, carrier, bowl)
  • Extra set of car keys and house keys
  • Can opener so you can try to bribe the zombie with food
  • Whistle to alert others in your area about zombie threats
  • N95 or surgical masks in case of environmental pathogens
  • Matches so you can light zombies on fire or start a fire to keep yourself warm
  • Rain gear and plastic sheeting to keep dry and hide from wandering zombies
  • Towels, which can be used for bedding, to wipe up messes and as bandages or tourniquets which will be needed if zombies bite
  • Work gloves so you can remove dead zombies from the area
  • Extra clothing, hat and sturdy shoes
  • Duct tape (which you can try to use to bind the zombies’ hands, feet and mouth).
  • Scissors (which will double as a helpful tool and anti-zombie weapon)
  • Household bleach (possibly good for pouring onto zombies so they melt, if they behave like the Wicked Witch of the West in The Wizard of Oz)
  • Blankets or sleeping bags to hide from the zombies
  • Extra cash to pay off the head zombie, so he and his cohorts will leave you alone

Make a Plan

  • Make sure you have a plan for contacting family and friends in the event of a zombie attack.
  • Develop an evacuation plan and practice it so you will be able to move quickly in the event of an actual zombie attack.
  • Decide before an actual zombie attack how you and loved ones will connect in case communication and transportation is compromised.

Be Informed

Zombie-related emergencies could range from severe headaches, dry eye, the heartbreak of psoriasis. Not to mention major clothing malfunctions and dirty mouth health issues. And remember Zombies can’t get affordable medical and dental care so you will be on your own. Even Obamacare won’t be able to help you.

To make sure you are updated about disasters, tune into radio stations, and sign up for mobile-phone updates. If your television is working, watch the news as well as reruns of The Walking Dead, where you will undoubtedly learn more about zombie activity than you ever cared to ask.

So what exactly is the point of the CDC’s “Zombie Apocalypse” campaign? For any type of disaster, preparation is the key. If you over-prepare for the worst case scenario (And, let’s face it; it doesn’t get worse than flesh-eating zombies), then you will be able to handle an emergency of any kind. The good news is that the CDC assures us that there is actually no basis for a real zombie apocalypse. We have provided these tips as a light-hearted way to remind you to prepare for disasters of any kind.

When a disaster strikes, prior planning and clear decisive action can help save lives.  For the latest emergency management training for facility/building managers, contact Allied Universal, Inc. Our new Version 3.0 e-based training system offers the best emergency training system.

As Hurricane Season Begins, Preparedness is Paramount

Monday, June 4th, 2012

FEMA Announces Wireless Emergency Alerts

Hurricane Season began on June 1, 2012. So, to mark the occasion, FEMA is providing new tools for federal, state, local, tribal and territorial officials to alert and warn the public about severe weather. Using the Commercial Mobile Alert System (CMAS), officials will be able to deliver Wireless Emergency Alerts (WEA) to participating wireless carriers for distribution to the public.

The alerts will be broadcast by cell towers much like AM/FM radio stations. So cell phones within range will immediately pick up the emergency signal. Availability of WEA alerts will be dependent on network status of the wireless carriers and handset availability, since not all cell phones are capable of receiving WEAs. To see if WEA alerts are available in your area and for your device, check with your wireless carrier.

“The wireless emergency alert capability provides an additional opportunity for the public to receive life-saving information needed to get out of harm’s way when a threat exists,” said Timothy Manning, FEMA deputy administrator for protection and national preparedness. “The public also has a critical role in their personal preparedness. There are a few simple steps that everyone can take to be prepared, like knowing which risks exist in your area and making a family emergency plan.”

WEAs will look like a text message, and will automatically appear on the mobile device screen showing the type and time of alert along with any action that should be taken. The message will be no more than 90 characters, and will have a unique tone and vibration. If an alert is received, FEMA says citizens should follow instructions and seek additional information from radio, television, NOAA Weather Radio and other official sources for emergency information. Remember that you should only call 911 in a life threatening situation.

With the start of hurricanes season, it is particularly important that you understand your risk, take action and be an example. While hurricanes are often proceeded by warnings that a threat is approaching, severe weather (such as high winds, inland flooding, severe storms and tornadoes) can occur at any time and in any place.

Individuals and business owners should take action to prepare in advance to make sure that family, friends, tenants and colleagues are ready for an emergency of any kind. Preparation can include filling out a family communications plan, assembling an emergency kit, running safety drills and storing important papers and valuables in a safe place.

“Be a force of nature by letting other people know that they, too, should get ready for hurricanes at the start of the season instead of waiting until after a hurricane warning is announced,” urges FEMA Director Craig Fugate.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ncssxFjEoAo

The Allied Universal Training System has been providing safety and security solutions to Commercial Real Estate companies for over 20 years. Our mission is to save lives through training with the motto: “Be Safe!” Don’t wait for a hurricane or severe weather-warning to stock up on supplies or come up with an evacuation plan. If you head to the store to stock up on water and supplies after a hurricane or severe weather announcement is made, you will just end up standing in line at a time when demand is high and supply is low. The time to prepare is now…before disaster strikes!

The Allied Universal Training System helps commercial buildings with compliance to fire life safety codes. Our interactive, building-specific e-learning training system motivates and rewards tenants instantly! It’s a convenient and affordable solution to all of the training needs of your building(s).

When a disaster of any kind strikes, prior planning and clear decisive action can help save lives. For the latest emergency management training for facility/building managers, contact Allied Universal, Inc. Our new Version 3.0 e-based training system offers the best emergency training system with automated and integrated features. What’s more, the NEW Allied Universal Property Messaging System is included FREE for all Allied Universal Online Training System users. Visit rjwestmore.com for more information.

Allied Universal Announces New Upgrade to Fire Life Safety Training System

Wednesday, May 16th, 2012

The Allied Universal Training System Version 3.0

Allied Universal Training System Version 3.0

Allied Universal Inc. is proud to announce the release of Version 3.0 of our comprehensive e-based safety training program. The new system boasts features that property managers and building owners, employers and occupants have come to depend on for building specific safety training, such as the integration and automation that brings together facility managers, fire safety directors and local fire departments. The system upgrade showcases our continued commitment to offer the most user-friendly and complete training system on the market. Here is a snapshot of some of the new functionality that Allied Universal trainees will enjoy with Version 3.0:

New “Basics for individuals who need Special Assistance”

Basic Special Assistance Guidelines are now automatically sent when individual users add themselves to the Allied Universal Special Assistance List. Users will find copies of this in “Your Resources,” under the “Forms, Lists and Guidelines bullet point.

Version 3.0 offers lots of great features.

New “Management Report”

All user-training base information (relative to the past and current year) is contained in one easy-to-use Excel report.

New “Occupants” Page

The “Occupants” Tab in all users’ database management system now displays:

  • Floor and suite information for every person
  • Color-coded “Previous” and “Current Year” certification dates
  • Past due training alert icon (over12 months)

New “System Notifications” Page

  • How users choose how to view messages
  • New Messages
  • Read Messages
  • Archived Messages—users can choose which messages to archive

New Social Media Links

  • This enables users to share news of their life-saving training with friends.

  • If you own or manage a building, or know someone who does, do them a favor. Let them know about the Allied Universal Training System. Choosing our service cuts property management training related workloads by 90% and saves users over 50% compared to conventional training! More importantly, IT SAVES LIVES! BE SAFE.

When a disaster of any kind strikes, prior planning and clear decisive action can help save lives. For the latest emergency management training for facility/building managers, contact Allied Universal, Inc. Our new Version 3.0 e-based training system offers the best emergency training system with automated and integrated features. What’s more, the NEW Allied Universal Property Messaging System is included FREE for all Allied Universal Online Training System users. Visit rjwestmore.com for more information.

Stroke Awareness Month Part 2

Tuesday, May 8th, 2012

Part 2 of a 2-Part Series

National Stroke Awareness Month is an annual event held each May since 1989, designed to make Americans aware that they may be able to “Save the Life” of a person experiencing a stroke…be it a co-worker, friend, neighbor or family member. In this second part of our two-week series about stroke awareness, we will cover the ways you can raise awareness about stroke prevention and treatment and how to identify and eliminate risk factors.

Over the years, public education campaigns have been conducted during May to increase awareness of different aspects of stroke that directly affect specific populations, such as women or those at high risk for stroke. Today, National Stroke Association continues educating the public through campaigns such as the Faces of Stroke℠ and by creating easy-to-use tools and resources that initiate individuals and groups to raise awareness on a local level.

According to Samaritan Stroke Services, risk factors for stroke include high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, heart disease, atrial fibrillation and smoking.

“If stroke or other risk factors run in your family, there’s a higher chance you could be at risk too,” says Karen Phillips, RN and clinical coordinator for Samaritan Stroke Services. “By talking to your doctor and taking preventative measures, you’ll have a much better chance of avoiding a stroke.”

What can you do this May to raise awareness about stroke prevention and treatment?

  1. Familiarize yourself with the emotional, physical and financial impacts that strokes have on our country.
  2. Influence others to improve their health by sharing personal stories of how stroke affects lives.
  3. Talk to legislators and thought leaders about how their decisions can positively affect survivors throughout their recovery.

What Can You Do to Lower Your Chance of Having a Stroke?

  • People with a family history of stroke are more likely to have a stroke. If you have such a history of stroke, let your doctor know.
  • Prevent and control high blood pressure
  • Prevent and control diabetes.
  • Eat healthy food
  • Maintain a healthy weight
  • Exercise
  • Abstain from using tobacco
  • Do not overindulge in alcohol (Don’t drink more than two drinks per day on average for men or more than one drink per day on average for women).
  • Treat atrial fibrillation.

The key to surviving a stroke is awareness and prompt medical attention. “Stroke does not have to be as debilitating as we once believed,” says James Meschia, M.D., director of Mayo Clinic’s Primary Stroke Center. “However, obtaining prompt medical attention is critical so the effects of a stroke can be limited and the patient’s condition can be managed to prevent further damage and improve recovery.”

When a disaster of any kind strikes, prior planning and clear decisive action can help save lives. For the latest emergency management training for facility/building managers, contact Allied Universal, Inc. Our new Version 3.0 e-based training system offers the best emergency training system with automated and integrated features. What’s more, the NEW Allied Universal Property Messaging System is included FREE for all Allied Universal Online Training System users. Visit rjwestmore.com for more information.

May is Stroke Awareness Month

Monday, April 30th, 2012

Part 1 of a 2-Part Series

National Stroke Awareness Month is an annual event held each May since 1989, designed to make Americans aware that they may be able to “Save the Life” of a person experiencing a stroke…be it a co-worker, friend, neighbor or family member. In fact, knowing what causes a stroke, what you can do to prevent one and what to do if you or someone else may be experiencing a stroke could save a life—possibly even your own. In this first of a two-post series, we will discuss the nature and causes of strokes as well as the ways to prevent and identify strokes.

According to the CDC, the National Stroke Association and the Mayo Clinic, stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States and is also a leading cause of serious long-term disability. There are approximately 795,000 new strokes reported in America each year. And although the majority of strokes strike people who are aged 65 years or older, strokes can actually occur at any age. In fact, according to a new study, Trends of Acute Ischemic Stroke Hospitalizations in the U.S., the CDC found that stroke hospitalizations have increased among both males and females aged 5–44 years old, raising concern about young people who might not be aware that they, too, could suffer from strokes.

A stroke or “brain attack” occurs when a blood clot blocks an artery or a blood vessel breaks, interrupting blood flow to an area of the brain. Brain cells die when they no longer receive oxygen and nutrients from the blood or when they are damaged by sudden bleeding. When these cells die during a stroke, the victim loses those abilities that are controlled by that area of the brain. These abilities include speech, movement and memory. How a stroke patient is affected depends on where the stroke occurs in how much of the brain is damaged.

For example, someone who has a small stroke may experience only minor problems such as weakness of an arm or leg. People who have large strokes may be paralyzed on one side or even lose their ability to speak. Although some people recover completely from strokes, more than 2/3 of survivors incur some type of disability.

The good news is that up to 80% of strokes are preventable. So, armed with the right information, you can prevent a stroke! The best thing you can do to prevent a stroke is to familiarize yourself with stroke symptoms. And, if you or anyone appears to be suffering a stroke, immediately call 911. Do not delay. Don’t worry about being embarrassed if the symptoms turn out to be something other than a stroke. It’s always better to be safe than sorry. In fact, calling at once is crucial in order to ensure treatment is administered in a timely fashion. Given at the onset of a stroke, new treatments can actually reduce the severity of a stroke for some victims.

The most common warning signs of a stroke are sudden:

  • Numbness or weakness of the face, arm or leg, especially on one side of the body
  • Confusion, trouble speaking or understanding or problems with memory, spatial orientation or perception
  • Trouble seeing in one or both eyes, blurred or double vision
  • Trouble walking, dizziness or loss or balance or coordination
  • Severe headache with no known cause which may be accompanied by a stiff neck, facial pain, pain between your eyes, vomiting or altered consciousness

“Every minute counts,” according to Karen Phillips, RN and clinical coordinator for Samaritan Stroke Services. “When someone is having a stroke, the sooner they are treated, the greater their chances are of having a complete recovery or experiencing limited damage. When strokes are treated within three hours with “clot-busting” medication, most patients will do very well, but that drug will not be as effective after three hours from the onset of the stroke, so time truly is of the essence.”

For more about strokes, check out next week’s Allied Universal blog posts. In the meantime, when a disaster of any kind strikes, prior planning and clear decisive action can help save lives. For the latest emergency management training for facility/building managers, contact Allied Universal, Inc. Our new Version 3.0 e-based training system offers the best emergency training system with automated and integrated features. What’s more, the NEW Allied Universal Property Messaging System is included FREE for all Allied Universal Online Training System users. Visit rjwestmore.com for more information.