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The CDC, Emergency Kits, and …..Zombies?!

Monday, May 30th, 2011
cartoon image of zombie in shadows of trees

Make sure you are prepared for everything--even zombies!

When you think about preparing for an emergency, you likely worry about threats that occur in your area. Californians contend with fires, mudslides and the specter of big quakes. East Coasters have hurricanes, floods, and damaging thunderstorms. But one threat can affect everyone from San Francisco through Topeka and beyond to Jacksonville. Zombies. Yep, brain-eating zombies who are bent on destruction.

Few scary scenarios capture popular culture quite like zombies. In real life, some individuals such as this man profiled by National Geographic Television view zombies and a possible outbreak as real scenarios that deserve proper planning. There even exists a book called “The
Zombie Survival Guide
.”

Wait. Isn’t this blog about disaster planning? Well, the CDC has a current campaign that warns of the coming “Zombie Apocalypse.” Citizens are encouraged to plan for “zombies” by taking certain initiatives. While the premise is silly, the CDC is using thoughts of a zombie takeover to get people really thinking about how to plan and manage big disasters.

For businesses that want to promote the zombie campaign, the CDC offers various images such as this one that look like the poster art for the newest zombie scare fest.

To prepare for the coming hordes of zombies, the CDC recommends some planning tips:

Create a disaster plan:

  • Discussing a disaster plan in advance can allow cooler heads to prevail (and not be eaten…) during an emergency.
  • Set two emergency meeting places. A primary spot and a distant alternate to be used in case the first one is inaccessible.

Stock your disaster kit:

  • Include some of the basics, such as light, food, and water. You need multiple flashlights with extra batteries, some canned or dried meals, and up to one gallon of water per person per day.
  • Additional items such as duct tape, plastic tarps, radios, and a whistle allow you to be prepared or reenact an episode of MacGyver.
  • Important family documents such as passports, insurance papers, and other essentials.
  • The CDC wisely leaves off the list items such as mines or bats that would truly be useful in a real zombie pandemic!

It’s refreshing to see such a serious organization as the CDC employing some humor like “Zombie Apocalypse” to get its point across. The campaign was also perfectly timed, coming days before the “end of the world” that thankfully did not come to pass. The zombie blog was so popular that it crashed the campaign’s site (not the CDC’s main site).

So what exactly is the point of the “Zombie Apocalypse?” For any type of disaster, preparation is the key. If you over prepare for the worst case scenario (it doesn’t get worse than flesh-eating zombies), then you will be able to handle any emergency.

When a disaster strikes, prior planning and clear decisive action can help save lives.  For the latest emergency management training for facility/building managers, contact Allied Universal, Inc. Our new Version 2.0 e-based training system offers the best emergency training system with automated and integrated features. Visit rjwestmore.com for more information and remember to BE SAFE.

The Real Deal for Earthquake Preparedness

Sunday, April 24th, 2011

House about to fall into a crack of earth

Take steps to make sure you are prepared in case of an earthquake or other disaster.

It’s easy to talk about disaster preparedness. At Allied Universal, Inc., we like to walk the talk. One example of the way we practice what we preach is our participation in the 2010 Great California ShakeOut, which was recognized by Cal EMA and the Earthquake Country Alliance. We were in good company, as some 7.9 million people actively participated in the 2010 event.

The 2011 ShakeOut will be held on October 20th, 2011 at 10:20 in the morning! So, why are we talking about an event that is six months away? Because earthquakes can happen at any time and often without advance warning. So, to limit loss of life and property, planning ahead is paramount to safety. We would also like to give you plenty of notice so you can make plans to participate in the next ShakeOut.

Unfortunately, much of the latest information about best practices to deal with earthquakes comes from past incidents. Despite the tragedy in terms of lives lost, it is important to take a broader review of disasters (such as the recent Japan quake), to prepare for the inevitability of future earthquake-related disasters:

  • Information sharing is critical. Some Japanese agencies received criticism for the slow spread of information relative to the depth of damage to infrastructure, particularly concerning the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant.
  • Tsunami and earthquake damage are under review by teams from several countries. The sheer scale of the disaster makes it an obvious example of a worst-case scenario, where individuals on top of four-story buildings were not even afforded safety. Groups from the United States are examining the types of buildings that did or did not escape the tsunami unscathed. The research could lead to drastic changes in building codes and provide opportunities for better safety in the future.
  • Scientists use data from the Japan quake to examine similarities in other geographic regions. Researchers are closely reviewing the Pacific Northwest of the United States which is in a similar subduction zone to Japan. Further review will allow better future placement of tsunami offshore beacons and will likely lead to changes in building strategies as well as warning systems.
  • In California, greater emphasis is placed on events like the ShakeOut because the desire to mine earthquake preparedness tips is so dire. Major California cities have avoided a massive earthquake for more than a century. And renewed vigilance is important to recognize the threat posed by a quake.

In the disaster planning field, unfortunately, actual disasters are often the most useful for emergency training. For example, large-scale tragedies can lead to analyzing and revamping building codes and emergency procedures to greatly reduce future destruction. So, when educational opportunities such as the ShakeOut arise, make sure you avail yourself of safe opportunities to learn.

Proper planning and learning the “Do’s” are the keys to managing the situation when disasters strike.  For the latest emergency management training for facility/building managers, contact Allied Universal, Inc. Our new Version 2.0 e-based training system offers the best emergency training system with automated and integrated features. Visit rjwestmore.com for more information and remember to BE SAFE.

 

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Using New Technology to Gauge Threats

Monday, April 18th, 2011
Seal of the US Dept of Homeland Security and Twitter

The Dept of homeland Security is using social media to alert the public about disasters.

Very shortly, news network viewers will no longer find out about updates via color-coded threat levels from the Department of Homeland Security. The current threat-level chart will be replaced by a two-level threat system known as the National Terrorism Advisory System. The first threat level will be coined “elevated,” and would warn about a credible threat, but not list possible targets.

A distinct difference to the previous system is that the two-level system will provide a start and end date for the threat. The second level will be “imminent” when law enforcement officers working with DHS determine a credible threat will very likely be attempted against certain targets. This level of alert would continue for not more than seven days, but could be extended. DHS will also incorporate social media alerts into the two-level system, recognizing the reach and the importance of such networks in the fast sharing of information.

First put into use in March 2002, the current system (officially known as the Homeland Security Advisory System), was established in response to the devastating 9/11 terrorist attacks. The system initially came under frequent criticisms, with many individuals claiming the threat level was often raised for political motives to incite citizen unrest. Others claimed the threat level did not move sufficiently to recognize actual threats, and was often held at an elevated status level.

According to DHS, the risk of terrorist attacks on U.S. soil remains, and citizens are encouraged to remain vigilant and report suspicious behavior. Law enforcement is continually training for possible attacks, even participating in testing exercises to measure readiness.

This type of readiness was evident in the thwarted New York’s Time Square bombing attempt in 2009, where a quick-thinking street vendor alerted authorities to a smoking van. The terror alert system reminds citizens about the threat of terrorism and encourages common sense as well as a broader sense of civic responsibility.

Government officials announced that terror alerts and information about threats will be distributed via two primary social networks when deemed appropriate, Twitter and Facebook. The department’s Twitter alerts page is @ntasalerts. The Department of Homeland Security’s Facebook page can be found at Facebook.com/HomelandSecurity. In some cases, distribution of specifics regarding an alert could jeopardize ongoing investigations. In such cases, information about terror threats might not reach the public until after the alleged terrorists are captured and the threat has been mitigated.

When a disaster strikes, prior planning and clear decisive action can help save lives.  For the latest emergency management training for facility/building managers, contact Allied Universal, Inc. Our new Version 2.0 e-based training system offers the best emergency training system with automated and integrated features. Visit rjwestmore.com for more information and remember to BE SAFE.

 

March is American Red Cross Month

Monday, March 7th, 2011

Save a life. Give blood.

Victims of disasters large and small almost always enjoy relief provided by the Red Cross. But not everyone is aware of the myriad ways that the American Red Cross goes beyond delivering basic first-responder assistance to deliver essentials such as blood and related supplies, CPR, First Aid training and more.

To recognize the important role of this venerable organization, each March is classified as American Red Cross Month. American Red Cross Month has a 68-year history which began in 1943 during the presidency of Franklin Roosevelt, who was the honorary chairman of the Red Cross at the time. His goal of raising $125 million was surpassed when $146 million in gifts rolled in, prompting Roosevelt to call the effort “the greatest single crusade of mercy in all of history.”

Continuing the history of presidential promotion of the American Red Cross Month, President Obama recently released a proclamation that detailed the vital role the organization plays in disaster recovery efforts.

How you can help:

  • Host a blood drive for your tenants. As host, you only need to provide a location and publicize the event. The Red Cross will manage donations and distribute funds.
  • Distribute donation information. A great option for those who would rather remain behind the scenes, the Red Cross offers a video detailing this process.
  • If you are interested in donating platelets, plasma, or double red cells, drop by an American Red Cross Blood Donation Center.

Corporations and individuals can help support the American Red Cross through other means:

  • Donate your frequent flier miles! Major carriers including Continental, United, US Airways and Delta allow the transfer of miles to the American Red Cross to help cover travel expenses for Red Cross volunteers.
  • Donate Hotel Loyalty Points. Several major hotel chains offer the option of transferring guest points to the Red Cross so they can be used to accommodate people who are displaced by disasters.
  • Become a volunteer! A searchable database is available to help you discover volunteer opportunities in your area.
  • It’s important to get a sense of the scale of relief and services that are provided by the American Red Cross in order to understand the organization’s needs. The American Red Cross:
  • Responds to nearly 200 disasters a day throughout the United States.
  • Supplies blood and blood products to 3,000 hospitals.
  • Manages the 38,000 blood donations are needed every day.
  • Alerts the public when supplies run low.
  • With 650 chapters and more than 30,000, the American Red Cross manages logistical and operational planning which requires considerable resources.

The American Red Cross is an integral part of our society, helping not only with large-scale disasters, but also assisting individuals who are involved in accidents and anyone who wants to prepare to administer First Aid.

When a disaster strikes, prior planning and clear decisive action can help save lives.  For the latest emergency management training for facility/building managers, contact Allied Universal, Inc. Our new Version 2.0 e-based training system offers the best emergency training system with automated and integrated features. Visit rjwestmore.com for more information and remember to BE SAFE.

 

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New Hope for Burn Victims

Tuesday, February 22nd, 2011
Flames and black smoke

New treatments help burn victims.

According to the American Burn Association, more than 450,000 burn incidents require medical treatment every year, with 10% of those requiring hospitalization.

As with any other injury, always err on the side of caution. Don’t hesitate to bring a burn victim to the emergency room or call an ambulance. Any blistering, sloughing or charring of the skin means the victim needs immediate help. If not treated properly, serious burns are easily infected and can cause severe scarring.

Burns are classified from 1st to 4th-degree, which each rising level showing an increase in the severity of the burns and the risks of complications.

Basic treatment for first degree and less severe second-degree burns:

  • Run cool (not cold) water on unbroken skin, but not on severe burns
  • Avoid applying topical ointments onto serious burns. First degree burns will benefit from ointments after the initial assessment.
  • Provide over-the-counter pain medication to help with swelling and pain

Skin grafts are the current method for helping heal severe burns in cases where amputation is not necessary:

  • A section of healthy skin is removed from an unaffected part of the victim’s body, or in some cases, skin is extracted from an animal.
  • Numerous risks and complications can result from skin grafts including infections, excessive bleeding, nerve damage, and loss of the grafted skin.
  • Patients are required to avoid bending over or stretching the area for 3-4 weeks, which can be very restrictive…particularly if the wounds are on the face or hands.

But good news is at hand. An innovative treatment that could revolutionize the way burn centers treat patients is gaining popularity. Patients who succumb to burns too often die because of the infections that occur while the patient waits for his or her skin grafts to heal. And this process can take weeks or months. A new procedure known as the “skin gun” takes a different approach:

  • The revolutionary procedure uses the patient’s own stem cells to promote healing.
  • A patient’s healthy skin cells are isolated and placed into a water-based solution.
  • This solution is loaded into a spray gun similar in design to those used to spray fine paints.
  • The doctor or technician sprays the stem cell solution directly onto the patient’s affected areas.
  • Healing begins immediately and early results from the procedure show dramatic improvements within hours or days.

Of course, preventing fires in the first place is the best course of action to eliminate the complications and consequences of being burned. There are many front-end precautions that can be taken to ensure against the start of fires. And in the unfortunate event that fires break out despite careful planning, there are many ways that fire events can be quickly contained if personnel receive the right training for skills such as extinguisher usage and proper evacuation procedures.

At Allied Universal, Inc., it is our pleasure to provide complimentary information about fire-life safety, disaster preparedness, public health and emergency management as a way to further our corporate mission to “Save Lives through Training.” We recently developed a new Property Messaging Tip Sheet as a courtesy to our clients because we sincerely desire that everyone who reads our blogs, posts and press releases as well as those who join our training program will BE SAFE.

When a disaster strikes, prior planning and clear decisive action can help save lives.  For the latest emergency management training for facility/building managers, contact Allied Universal, Inc. Our new Version 2.0 e-based training system offers the best emergency training system with automated and integrated features. Visit rjwestmore.com for more information.

BE SAFE: How Social Media Saves Lives

Monday, February 14th, 2011
Globe Cloaked in Social Media Protective Banner

Social Media is not just for social interaction anymore.

While some might think that websites like Twitter are only good for tracking celebrity exploits, they are proving incredibly useful for disaster preparation and emergency management.
For example, FEMA is adopting social media websites to share information about disasters and coordination efforts. Created in response to the successful use social media following the Haiti earthquake in 2010, the FEMA initiatives aim to harness the power of social media to spread life-saving, instantaneous information.

Social Media in Action

During the recent floods in Australia, social media sites such as Twitter and Facebook were instrumental for organizing-efforts. The emergency services in Queensland relied on social media sites for real-time updates on conditions in different areas. This data was used to allocate limited resources and aided in overall disaster planning.

The Australia floods highlighted the particular strengths of Facebook and Twitter, the two most popular social sites. Twitter proved most valuable as a way to spread information very rapidly and widely. During the floods, there were an estimated 1,200 flood-related status updates to Twitter “Tweets” per hour. The short (140) character lengths and ability to quickly “follow” those who were posting pertinent information allowed many residents to stay safe.

Facebook was utilized for providing more detail and acting as a way to manage relief activities. One of example of this occurred when an area animal shelter was at risk of flooding. Facebook was used to find homes for all of the displaced animals.

In all instances of the use of social media in disasters, the public becomes a valuable resource for helping the efforts of emergency management professionals. Acting as “first responders,” the general public can provide immediate information which can be used to affect the routing of emergency supplies and other emergency management efforts.

For emergency management officials, it’s important to keep an eye on the information flowing from the social media universe. Any grossly erroneous information should be quickly rebutted from official sources since one downside to the speed of social media is that misinformation can proliferate. So it’s important to monitor the social conversation. According to a Red Cross survey, 69 percent of respondents fully expect emergency management agencies to actively monitor and respond to emergency requests via social media sites.

Another recent use of social media was during the January blizzard that affected the Midwest. In Chicago, road clearing management personnel posted real-time progress of plowing efforts using phones or tablet devices. The National Weather service was also involved, through its efforts in spreading alerts through Twitter and Facebook.

Social media use during the floods and other disasters also act as aggregators of public sentiment and concern. Officials can use social media data to prepare official videos or flyers that address particular needs.

Usage of social media is a great medium for members of the general public and official emergency agencies to work together for the common good. By responsibly using the platform, the public can quickly learn what is happening and where they can go to help, while emergency officials can discover where to send rescue teams and allocate resources.

When a disaster strikes, prior planning and clear decisive action can help save lives.  For the latest emergency management training for facility/building managers, contact Allied Universal, Inc. Our new Version 2.0 e-based training system offers the best emergency training system with automated and integrated features. Visit rjwestmore.com for more information and remember to BE SAFE.

Shanghai Fire – Lessons from Catastrophe

Monday, December 6th, 2010
high-rise buildings on fire

Lessons learned from the Shanghai Fire

An unfortunate fire in a 28-story Shanghai apartment building claimed the lives of 58 people, with dozens injured and some missing persons unaccounted for. By using the fire as a case study, we can point out ways to avoid this kind of catastrophe in your high-rise property.

The Shanghai apartment building was undergoing renovations for a planned energy-saving project. The scaffolding used for the construction project was made of flammable bamboo and nylon netting. Preliminary investigations uncovered several issues and pointed blame towards several parties:

  • Careless work by unlicensed subcontractor workers ignited the nylon netting which surrounded the building. The fire quickly spread to the bamboo scaffolding frame as well as the building itself.
  • The structure did not feature an indoor fire prevention sprinkler system, as these are not commonly used in high-rise buildings in that area.
  • In addition to the flammable scaffolding, the building was also insulated with polyurethane foam which does not contain flame retardant additives.

Chinese authorities took swift action to hold individuals accountable, and have arrested 13 individuals, including the CEO of one of the companies which was responsible for part of the construction and the former head of an interior design firm. Eight unlicensed welders were also arrested.

Many residents and newscasters are critical of the local fire department’s role in handling the blaze:

  • At 28 stories, the building is one of the smaller structures compared to its surroundings. Residents reported observing firefighting-equipment that could reach only to the 20th floor of the building. This raised doubts about the local fire department’s ability to properly fight high-rise fires.
  • The fire took four hours to bring under control, despite the presence of 1,300 firefighting personnel and 120 firefighting engines. Many residents and critics view this length of time to be excessive and an example of a combination of improper training of firefighters and substandard equipment.

While the fire was unfortunate, tragic accidents provide opportunities to learn from and avoid similar mistakes. What can you implement as a building owner to prevent catastrophe?

  • If conducting repairs, make sure you and your general contractor take into account all activities performed by subcontractors. In the Shanghai fire, proper protocols for the welding crew were not followed.
  • Resist the urge to cut corners by using unlicensed workers. Such workers may be experienced and offer lower prices. But the use of un-papered workers poses a major safety violation that places you at risk of liability and everyone in danger.
  • Ensure residents or occupants are well versed in proper fire life safety procedures. The Allied Universal Fire Life Safety Training System is the perfect way to prepare tenants for every kind of emergency.
  • Conduct annual evacuation drills with designated meeting places and alternate routes in case primary exit routes are obstructed.

Proper fire safety is a comprehensive initiative that requires building owners and managers to carefully consider many interrelated issues. Learning from mistakes that caused past disasters is a strong reminder to follow safety, code and building procedures.

When a disaster strikes, prior planning and clear decisive action can help save lives.  For the latest emergency management training for facility/building managers, contact Allied Universal, Inc. Our new Version 2.0 e-based training system offers the best emergency training system with automated and integrated features. Visit rjwestmore.com for more information and remember to BE SAFE.

Allied Universal, Inc. Among First to Receive BIF Certification

Monday, September 27th, 2010
Allied Universal, Inc. was one of the first to receive BIF Certification.

Allied Universal, Inc. was one of the first to receive BIF Certification.

In the city of Los Angeles, a new fire life safety training code LAMC 57.33.19 requires all high-rise building owners to complete building-specific diagrams of elevators, stairwells, typical floor plans, building-specific information sheets as well as standpipe and risers and must make the information available for the LAFD to access online. One of the first two companies to receive this new certification, Allied Universal, Inc. stands poised to be able to create code-compliance forms for your high-rise building located anywhere in the country, for a nominal fee.

Although Los Angeles is the first city to institute the certificate-requirement, the requisite will eventually be nationwide. At the forefront is Allied Universal Inc., whose mission is to save lives through training with the motto, “BE SAFE.” Our interactive, building-specific e-learning training system motivates and rewards tenants instantly! It’s a convenient and affordable solution to all of the training needs of your residential and commercial building(s).

The designation equips Allied Universal, Inc. to provide Fire Life Safety Systems information which can be referenced from fire department control rooms, onboard computers, fire station desktops and compatible handheld devices. Having ready-access to building-inventory forms is crucial for emergency personnel who benefit from prior knowledge of potential entries and exits so they can make informed decisions about on-site fire life safety strategies.

“We are pleased to announce our BIF Certification since it shows that we are qualified to produce documentation about all of the information unique to each building,” said Allied Universal, Inc. CEO and President Robert Westmore, “The BIF forms we prepare will not only benefit fire departments who can check stats while en route to any high-rise emergency, but will also ultimately help property owners and managers protect their real estate investments.”

The BIF Cert will benefit companies as well as the fire department, which is why Allied Universal, Inc. is leading the way by offering to prepare structure Inventory Forms for any high-rise structure (which is defined as any building that is 75 feet or higher.) Don’t wait until your city requires your compliance. Contact us today and we’ll take care of everything.

When a disaster strikes, prior planning and clear decisive action can help save lives. For the latest emergency management training for facility/building managers, contact Allied Universal, Inc. And in the meantime, BE SAFE.

Hurricane Communications

Tuesday, September 7th, 2010
Prepare for Hurricanes by Following Forecasts

Prepare for Hurricanes by Following Forecasts

Final Post in a Series about Hurricane Preparedness

Hurricanes are unique emergencies in that they are predictable. So there is no excuse for failing to prepare to respond. Although you can’t control when a hurricane or other emergency may happen, it’s imperative that you take personal responsibility to make sure you are ready. This week, in our final post in a series about preparing and recovering from tropical storms and hurricanes, we’ll examine where to turn to stay on top of forecasts and local emergency plans.

Since the best way to deal with a hurricane is to prepare for one, you should acquaint yourself with websites and notification centers as well as the terminology used to distinguish between different storm warnings. This is crucial for all those who live and/or work in a high-risk area. Monitor weather patterns and warnings so you will know when to take evasive action. Here are a few helpful resources, offering easily-accessible weather-related information in real time:

AccuWeather.com

American Red Cross

The Disaster Center

FEMA Storm Watch

FindLocalWeather

Intellicast.com

Local Weather Forecast Center

National Hurricane Center

National Weather Service

NOAA

NOLA

Weather Bug

The Weather Channel

WeatherForYou.com

Many of the above sites offer RSS feeds and desktop notifications and email alerts. Another free weather notification system is available via the Emergency Email and Wireless Network, which provides breaking weather alerts and an information-packed National Weather Situation Page.

Once you are set up to receive weather updates, the next step in hurricane preparedness is to be able to distinguish between the terminologies used to describe various storm systems. Where hurricanes and tropical storms are concerned, the following definitions are critical.

WATCH vs. WARNING: THE DIFFERENCE

TROPICAL STORM WATCH

Tropical storm conditions (defined by sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph) are possible within a specified coastal area within 48 hours.

TROPICAL STORM WARNING

Tropical storm conditions (defined by sustained winds of 39 to 73 mph) are expected somewhere within a specified coastal area within 36 hours.

HURRICANE WATCH

Hurricane conditions (defined by sustained winds of 74 mph or higher) are possible within a specified coastal area. Because hurricane preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, the hurricane watch is issued 48 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds.

HURRICANE WARNING

An announcement that hurricane conditions (defined by sustained winds of 74 mph or higher) are expected somewhere within a specified coastal area. Because hurricane preparedness activities become difficult once winds reach tropical storm force, the hurricane warning is issued 36 hours in advance of the anticipated onset of tropical-storm-force winds.

Once you determine that a hurricane or tropical storm watch or warning is in effect, take the following steps:

  • Listen to a battery-operated radio or television for hurricane progress reports.
  • Check emergency supplies.
  • Fuel car.
  • Bring in outdoor objects such as lawn furniture, toys, and garden tools and anchor objects that cannot be brought inside.
  • Secure buildings by closing and boarding up windows. Remove outside antennas.
  • Turn refrigerator and freezer to coldest settings. Open only when absolutely necessary and close quickly.
  • Store drinking water in clean bathtubs, jugs, bottles, and cooking utensils.
  • Review your evacuation plan.

When a disaster strikes, prior planning and clear decisive action can help save lives. For the latest emergency management training for facility/building managers, contact Allied Universal, Inc. Check back next week, when we will continue our series about hurricane safety and preparation. In the meantime, BE SAFE.

Fire Safety: A to Z

Monday, August 9th, 2010
Fire Safety A-Z

Fire Safety A-Z

Final Post in Our Fire-Safety Series

For the final post in our series about fire safety, we would like to recap the top 26 tips for preventing and responding to fires at home and work, as well as a myriad of reasons for signing up for The Allied Universal Safety Training System.

A~A to D Fire Extinguishers

(With so many fire extinguishers to choose from, selecting the proper one for use at your home and in the office can be a daunting task. Since use of the wrong type of fire can actually cause the fire to spread, pay careful attention to the difference.)

A-Rated Extinguishers– extinguish ordinary combustible materials such as paper, wood, cardboard, and most plastics. The numerical rating on these indicates the amount of water they will hold and the amount of fire they are capable of extinguishing.
B-Rated Extinguishers– battle flammable or combustible liquids such as gasoline, kerosene, grease and oil. The numerical rating for this class indicates the approximate number of square feet of fire they can extinguish.

C-Rated Extinguishers– fight fires caused by electrical equipment, appliances, wiring, circuit breakers and outlets. Never use water to extinguish class C fires. The risk of electrical shock is far too great! Class C extinguishers do not have a numerical rating. The C classification means the extinguishing agent is non-conductive.

D-Rated Extinguishers– are most commonly used in chemical laboratories. They are for fires that involve combustible metals, such as magnesium, titanium, potassium and sodium. These extinguishers do not feature numerical ratings or multi-purpose ratings. Instead, they are designed for class D fires only.

Emergency Evacuation Plan If fire extinguishers are required or provided in your workplace, and if anyone will be evacuating during a fire or other emergency, then OSHA’s 29 CFR 1910.157 requires you to have an EAP.

Fumes from containers that are not properly sealed can be carried on air currents to the flame of a water heater or the pilot light on a stove.

Gas Appliance fires lead to the deaths of 14 people annually, who succumb to carbon monoxide poisoning. These deaths are caused by gas appliances and flues which have not been properly installed or maintained. Make sure your gas-powered appliances are in good working-condition.

High-Quality Animation keeps clients engaged. To ensure the highest rate of retention possible, Allied Universal Inc. hired former Disney, DreamWorks, and Warner Bros. artists to create engaging animated online e-tutorials.

Integrated System-A fully-integrated system, the Allied Universal Training System allows property management companies to manage one site or an entire portfolio, with all users in the same system.

Join the US Green Building Council which is a non-profit community of leaders working to make green buildings available to everyone within a generation. Allied Universal, Inc. is a proud member of the USGBC. Reducing needless waste lessens the risk of e-related fire.

K-Rated Fire Extinguishers are manufactured to battle fires that involve vegetable oils, animal oils, or fats in cooking appliances. This is for commercial kitchens, including those found in restaurants, cafeterias and catering locations.

Landfill fires are on the rise. The EPA says that as we become more dependent on electronic products to make life more convenient, the stockpile of used, obsolete products continues to grow. To help prevent this type of fire risk, dispose of e-waste responsibly.

Make sure your tenants know evacuation routes. The best way to do this is to conduct regular drills.

NFPA National Fire Protection Association endeavors to reduce the worldwide burden of fire and other hazards on the quality of life by providing and advocating consensus codes and standards, research, training and education.

Our interactive, building-specific e-learning training system motivates and rewards tenants instantly! It’s a convenient and affordable solution to all of the training needs of your building(s).

Post Evacuation Routes clearly, so locations become second nature during actual emergencies.

Quiz your tenants, employees and family members regularly to make sure they remember safe evacuation routes and emergency procedures.

Reduce, reuse and recycle. Encourage tenants to delay purchasing new equipment when current electronics work properly. Reusing toner cartridges and cell phones puts less of a strain on natural resources.

Slightest Spark can start a devastating fire; so proper handling and use as well as proper storage of volatile materials are essential.

Tenant Safety is of paramount importance to property owners and managers. With our system, you can train occupants, floor wardens, and fire safety directors how to respond in emergencies. All user-training and testing is recorded and available for review at your convenience.

Up to Code– Federal, state, and local laws require annual training for every commercial building occupant. However, studies show that less than 20% of occupants have ever trained or know what to do in an emergency. That means 80% of your occupants are at risk and could represent a liability to themselves and you.

View Map Link– Allied Universal Inc. clients have access to multiple views of individual properties and the surrounding areas in our Version 2.0 system. The maps not only provide driving directions to the building. But, more importantly, they provide access to Google Earth 3-D views of the surrounding area. Such detail prevents emergency responders from “flying blind” in an emergency.

Watch for fire risks. A fire watch ensures the fire-safety of a building or area in the event of any act, e.g., hot work, or situation instigating an increased risk to persons or property.

Xeric conditions pose greater risk of fire. Make sure dry landscaping around buildings is watered on a regular basis.

You can train occupants, floor wardens, and fire safety directors with our system. All user-training and testing is recorded. Get quick access to building specific Emergency Responder information and other resources.

Zealously guard your property to ensure fire safety strategies are observed. At Allied Universal, Inc., our mission is to create a safer, more informed occupant who understands their responsibilities and may be capable of helping others.

When a disaster strikes, prior planning and clear decisive action can help save lives. For the latest emergency management training for facility/building managers, contact Allied Universal, Inc. Check back next week, when we will begin a series about hurricane safety and preparation. In the meantime, BE SAFE