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Archive for the ‘online safety training’ Category

Down Syndrome Awareness Month

Tuesday, October 29th, 2019

Down Syndrome Awareness MonthIn our ongoing effort to promote public health and safety, we wanted to take the opportunity to call attention to an important associated observance, held annually across the United States in October: Down Syndrome Awareness Month. The National Association for Down Syndrome (NADS) created the campaign in the 1980’s to educate the public, provide families with information and resources, and address social policy issues and challenges facing the Down Syndrome community. The Allied Universal Fire Life Safety Training System is tailor-made to educate people from this (and every other) special needs’ community. The system is designed to help everyone prepare for and recover from natural and manmade disasters. What’s more, the system reminds subscribers to pay careful attention to anyone who may require additional assistance in an emergency. (more…)

Distracted Driving Part 2: 10 Tips For Distraction-Free Driving

Tuesday, April 9th, 2019

 

Distracted Driving public safety

Distracted driving puts everyone on the road at risk.

(Part 2 of a 2-Part Series)

Americans drive 3.2 trillion miles per year. Over that same time period, U.S. consumers send 2.2 trillion text messages. The problem is that many people combine the mutually exclusive activities. The result is as deadly as it is dangerous. In our ongoing efforts to promote and share safety-related content, we began a two-part series about the dangers of distracted driving in honor of Distracted Driving Awareness Month. The series discusses the risks associated with this dangerous yet popular habit and offers tips to discourage the behavior. Click here to read part one. (more…)

Holiday Shopping Safety

Tuesday, December 4th, 2018

Holiday Shopping SafetyAlthough Black Friday and Cyber Monday 2018 are over, the holiday shopping frenzy is far from done. In fact, Nielsen projects that seasonal sales will top $923 billion, with $106 billion in purchases expected to originate online. Unfortunately, holiday shopping breeds crime. In fact, a recent survey reveals that most scams and package theft, worldwide, occur during the period between Thanksgiving and New Year’s Day. So, how can you shut down the Grinch? Follow these tips for a safe holiday shopping season. (more…)

Emergency Preparedness Month 2018

Tuesday, September 4th, 2018

Disaster Preparedness Plan 2018Each year, government organizations such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), nonprofit agencies, such as the American Red Cross and private enterprise, including Allied Universal, to mark September as the official month to observe national emergency preparedness. All year long, members of educational, municipal and community groups across the United States should prepare to respond to an infectious disease outbreak, chemical or radiological release, or other manmade or natural disaster. To that end, September 15 is designated National Day of Action. While the CDCis using this year’s campaign to highlight preparedness in regard to public health, FEMA is turning its attention toward emergency planning.  (more…)

Landslides and Mudslides

Tuesday, August 7th, 2018

Landslides Severe WeatherSevere Weather: Landslides & Mudslides

Part 3 in a 3-Part Series

Weather-related disasters lead to devastating loss of life and cost billions of dollars each year. The first post in our three-part series about severe weather disasters focused on extreme heat. The second entry discussed floods. This last post will tackle landslides and mudslides, since they so often accompany other severe-weather events.  (more…)

CERC Training

Tuesday, March 13th, 2018

CERC TrainingOne of the most important tools for effective disaster management is communication. With lives at risk, the need to quickly, effectively and accurately communicate is crucial. To train stakeholders and entire communities to make the best possible decisions for their well-being during a crisis or emergency, the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) developed Crisis and Emergency Risk Communication (CERC) in 2002. CERC draws from lessons learned by public health officials, psychologists and emergency risk managers. The CDC’s CERC program provides training sessions, tools and resources to help health communicators, emergency responders and leaders of organizations communicate effectively during emergencies.  (more…)

How to Prepare & Recover from Disasters

Tuesday, September 19th, 2017

Part 3 of a 3-part Series

As teachers, educators and administrators across the country welcome students to a new academic year, we want to help ensure your child starts 2017-2018 off right. School safety is of paramount importance since children spend more hours at school than anywhere besides their own homes. Facing myriad obstacles, such as transportation challenges, cyber bullying and peer pressure, and handling emergencies and disasters, students need to proactively take steps to #BeSafe.

The first entry of our three-part series about back-to-school safety focused on how to keep your child safe on the way to and from school. The second blog post focused on how to be safe while at school, relative to bullying. In the final post, we will cover the topic of how to be safe at school before, during and after emergencies or disasters.  (more…)

Cyber Safety in College

Tuesday, February 21st, 2017

Part 3 of a 3-Part Series 

Attending college is a grand adventure, whether students choose to live on campus or commute. It also can prove risky for anyone who fails to sufficiently prepare for potential emergencies.

Campus Safety Recap

In our ongoing effort to save lives through training, the Allied Universal Fire Life Training System is expanding our online safety education to include residence hall fire life safety. Using building-specific information, students living in campus housing who attend subscribing universities will be able to log in to modules designed to train them to be safe, whether they live in a residence hall, traditional or suite-style residence, on or off campus. To help college students stay safe while attending college, we are doing a three-part blog series about campus safety.

Password protection is crucial to cyber security.

In part one, we offered helpful tips for keeping students safe relative to fire. Part two focused on personal safety while in college. For this final entry, we cover college safety relative to cyber security.

Cyber Safety

Each year, college IT departments deal with hundreds or thousands of new and returning students who show up with laptops, desktops, smartphones and tablets—all of which need to connect to the campus network. This is a scary proposition where online security is concerned, so students should prepare to eliminate risks, both for their own safety as well as that of their college.

Most college students today are infinitely more familiar with computer equipment than most of their parents and grandparents. Unfortunately, this familiarity can breed contempt, as most assume that cybercrime happens to other, less computer-savvy people. In fact, they are often referred to as “the click generation,” because they are so quick to click on website links and social media before considering the consequences. Another habit that puts them and their computers at risk is the sheer number of hours they spend online.

Cyber The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has an aggressive cyber security branch, which focuses on cyberspace and its underlying infrastructure, both of which are vulnerable to a wide range of risk—stemming from both physical and cyber threats and hazards. Sophisticated cyber actors and nation-states exploit vulnerabilities to steal information and money and are developing capabilities to disrupt, destroy, or threaten the delivery of essential services. The DHS current cyber security campaign, Stop. Think. Connect encourages Internet users of all ages to take responsibility for their own cyber safety.

Here are five tips to follow, to help keep college kids cyber safe:

  1. Keep a Clean Machine—Utilize malware software. Run regular security scans. Scan every device before inserting into a computer. Think twice before inserting an unknown flash drive into any computer. Not only should the source who provided the flash drive be trustworthy, but his or her cyber habits should be beyond reproach.
  2. Protect Personal Info—Secure accounts with strong passwords. Change passwords often. Don’t write them on Post-it notes placed next to the machine. Set stringent security protocols on laptops, tablets, phones and desktop computers. Hackers and identity thieves can only access information provided over the Web. Stick to online activity that doesn’t require full name or contact information unless you are using a trusted site for online purchases, such as PayPal, eBay or and Amazon. Be skeptical of an unknown site that asks for email, credit card number or home address.
  3. Connect with Care—Refrain from clicking hyperlinks sent in emails. Avoid doing anything of a personal nature while using a public hotspot. Make sure connections are secure (encrypted) whenever doing online banking or paying bills. And even while using a trusted social media platform, avoid revealing items of a personal nature such as school name, favorite hangout spot, and make/model of your car.
  4. Be Web Wise—If something seems too good to be true, it probably is. Students should think twice before ordering online from an unknown vendor. Trust your gut. Use only trusted websites. Keep abreast of known Internet threats. Think before typing or clicking.
  5. Be a Good Online Citizen—Apply the *Golden Rule to everything done online. Help fight cybercrime by reporting anything unusual to the Department of Homeland Security .
  6. Check your school’s systems. Students should also contact campus safety department and IT department for best practices and tips recommended for their specific institution’s systems.

*Do unto others as you would have done to you.

Remember that safety in the 3D world, as well as cyberspace, is a priority for everyone all year long. A convenient and affordable way to make sure you are prepared for disasters and emergencies of virtually every kind is to subscribe to the Allied Universal Fire Life Training System, which has been designed to help improve and save lives. For more information about the best system out there, or to subscribe, click here.

Allied Universal Corp Blog Announces Exciting Development

Tuesday, August 11th, 2015

SnipImage

Allied Universal Online Training Now Compatible with an iPad

Property managers and fire life safety professionals spoke and we have listened, by implementing noteworthy changes to our online training software. Subscribers can now easily access safety training via iPads in addition to their laptops and desktop computers.

With the mission to “save lives through training,” the Allied Universal System was developed to help building owners and property managers provide a cost effective, user friendly way to comply with fire life safety codes. Our interactive, building-specific e-learning training system motivates and rewards tenants instantly (with display-quality certificates) for completing online safety training. Thanks to our new update, this training is accessible not only via desktop or laptop computer but also on an iPad, or even an iPhone!

 “We are thrilled to be able to provide a tool that helps property managers get the job done! Offering iOS-compatible modules will improve safety training options for property managers, offering tenants accessible life-saving training for their employees who would otherwise go unprepared,” says Director of Allied Universal Kimber Westmore. “We are passionate about training because it saves lives.”

SnipImage (1)By and large, millennial and entrepreneurial tenants tend to prefer open concept working environments. The Allied Universal Training System is perfect for this professional trend for several reasons:

      • When users are sharing space and do not want to cause a distraction to their colleagues, the animated training can be muted and the text-on-screen option can be chosen.
  • Millennials typically do not hold to a 9-5 workday, choosing to use iPads in a coffeehouse or otherwise out of the office. Access to material that’s available via iPad around the clock makes our training more user-friendly.
  • Millennials typically prefer training online and on demand videos to attending expensive seminars or reading textbooks or training manuals. The Allied Universal Training System enables users to learn on-demand in short, entertaining modules.

Upper view of business people around table

Rest assured, however, that the Allied Universal Training System is not geared exclusively to the younger generation.

Our system has been designed to meet the needs of property managers and their tenants in all age groups and from all walks of life. In fact, it allows property management companies to manage a single site or an entire portfolio, with all users in the same system. It can also be used to train occupants, floor wardens, and fire safety directors. All user training and testing is documented, and material is always readily available, offering quick access to building-specific Emergency Responder information and other resources.

“People love our training,” says Director of Operations Lora Sargeant. “We continue to grow and we add modules and features on request because we want to make sure that we continue to remain at the forefront of online safety training. The more people who take advantage of our training, the more lives that can be saved.”

We hope this blog post will motivate you to do whatever it takes to #BeSafe. A convenient and affordable way to make sure you are prepared for disasters and emergencies of virtually every kind is to subscribe to the Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services, which has been designed to help improve and save lives. For more information about our system, or to subscribe, click here.

How to Avoid Trips, Slips and Falls

Tuesday, May 26th, 2015

Businessman about to step on a banana skin

According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, two million broken bones occur every year in the U.S. due to osteoporosis. What’s more, most people proceed with fracture repair without ever realizing they have osteoporosis or low bone mass. Join us in celebrating National Osteoporosis Month this May by taking action to Break Free from Osteoporosis. The Break Free from Osteoporosis campaign encourages everyone to get to know their risk factors for osteoporosis and make the lifestyle changes needed to build strong bones for life.

At the Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services, our first priority is the safety of our employees, clients and the general public. As a company, it is our goal to make every attempt to eliminate the potential for accidents. Slips, trips and falls represent a serious hazard to workers in the security industry and are responsible for well over half of the nonfatal injuries that result in days away from work. In honor of National Osteoporosis Month, we have devoted this week’s blog post to an important part of bone health—preventing slips, trips and falls.

The following post was written by Angela Burrell, manager of public relations for our corporate company, Universal Services of America.

Natl Osteo MosFirst and foremost, stay focused and alert for hazards that may cause a slip, trip or fall. Good housekeeping, quality of walking surfaces (flooring), proper footwear and preparing facilities are all critical for preventing accidents that could result from wet surfaces, occasional spills, loose mats or other hazards.

Additionally, by partnering with clients, security teams can help prevent slips, trips and falls to reduce serious injuries that could lead to customer civil liability lawsuits and expensive worker compensation claims.

Here are some tips to follow and recommendations that you could make:

Reduce the risk of slipping on wet flooring by:

  • Encouraging the use of slip-resistant footwear.
  • Taking your time, paying attention and making wide turns at corners while walking.
  • Protecting entrances to employee areas with matting designed to absorb water.
  • Placing paper towel holders, trash cans and umbrella bags near entrances to reduce wet floors.
  • Providing slip-resistant stair treads on permanent stairs.
  • Recommending installation of grab bars or railing in doorways and stairwells.

Report or correct the following housekeeping conditions:

  • Debris, spills or wet areas on floors, stairs or walkways
  • Mats, rugs and carpets that may become obstacles themselves
  • File cabinet or storage drawers left open, especially on top levels
  • Exposed cables or bulky power cords that are not properly secured or protected
  • Burned out lights in work areas, parking structures or walkways

Be proactive

  • Mark hazardous areas whenever necessary. Use temporary signs, cones, barricades or floor stand signs to warn people passing by.
  • Block off areas during floor cleaning. Remove all signs once the floor is clean and dry so they do not become commonplace and ignored.

For more information about National Osteoporosis Month, check out the National Osteoporosis Foundation website. We hope that this blog post will motivate you to begin or maintain a regular physical fitness routine for optimal health and aspire to prevent accidents. A convenient and affordable way to make sure you are prepared for disasters and emergencies of virtually every kind is to subscribe to the Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services, which has been designed to help improve and save lives. Visit rjwestmore.com to read about the many ways proper planning can make a difference in numerous aspects of your professional and personal life.