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Great ShakeOut 2017

Wednesday, October 11th, 2017

Our hearts go out to earthquake victims, their family, friends and colleagues.

Earthquakes in the News

With two powerful earthquakes striking Mexico last month, now is a good time to reinforce the notion of earthquake safety. The 46th annual International ShakeOut Day will be held October 19, prompting millions of people worldwide to practice how to drop, cover, and hold on. In California, where Allied Universal’s Corporate West Headquarters is located, Great Shakeout Drills will occur on the 19th, at precisely 10:19 a.m.

ShakeOut Part of America’s PrepareAthon

Participating in one of the worldwide drills is a great way for family and organization members to prepare to survive and recover quickly from major earthquakes, whether they occur while you are at work, at home, or traveling. The Shakeout is part of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA)’s ongoing safety campaign, America’s PrepareAthon!

Failing to Plan is Planning to Fail

If you reacted to earthquakes in the past by running outside, ignoring the shaking or ducking under someone’s desk and survived unscathed, these experiences may have given you a false sense of security. Until you experience the strong shaking of a major earthquake, accompanied by sudden and intense back and forth motions, which can cause the floor or ground to sway, you could make the mistake of failing to recognize the fact that strong earthquakes can cause you to topple, fall, or go airborne – potentially leading to serious injury. The next time the ground beneath you starts to shake, don’t wait to see if the shaking will be strong. Instead, learn to immediately protect yourself after the first jolt – no matter its strength.

Studies of injuries and deaths caused by earthquakes in the U.S. over the last several decades indicate that people are likely to be injured by falling or flying objects (TVs, lamps, glass, bookcases, etc.) than to die in a collapsed building. Experts agree the plan to Drop, Cover, and Hold On offers the best overall level of protection in most situations.

Earthquake Safety Away from Home

What if you are driving, in a theater, in bed, or on vacation when the earth starts to shake? Try to move but immediately protect yourself as best as possible. Earthquakes occur without warning and might be so violent that you are unable to run or crawl. In such severe cases, you could be knocked to the ground. You will never know if the initial jolt could be a prelude to “The Big One.” So, no matter where you are when you feel the earth shaking, drop, cover and hold on! In most situations, your chance of injury will be reduced if you

  • Drop onto your hands and knees, right where you are. This position protects you from being knocked down and allows you to stay low and crawl to shelter if nearby. Wherever you are when an earthquake strikes, protect yourself!
  • Cover your head and neck with one arm and hand. If a sturdy table or desk is nearby, crawl underneath it for shelter. If shelter is not nearby, crawl next to an interior wall (away from windows). Stay on your knees; bend over to protect vital organs.
  • Hold On until the shaking stops. Under shelter: cover it with one hand; be ready to move with your shelter if it shifts. Without shelter: hold on to your head and neck with both arms and hands.

Persons with Disabilities: See these instructions for dealing with earthquakes if you are disabled. These recommendations apply to anyone who uses a wheelchair, walker, or is unable to drop to the ground and get up again without assistance.

Drill, drill, drill

As with anything, practice makes perfect. To be ready to protect yourself immediately when the ground begins to shake, practice Drop, Cover, and Hold On at school and on the job at least once each year. Click here to sign up to fine a Great ShakeOut near you. If your building management subscribes to the Allied Universal online training system, you will find more information about the Great Shake Out and preparation tips for you and your family and/or coworkers on the training system website.

What NOT to do:

  • Despite training you may have received as a child, do not get in a doorway! This practice became popular because an early earthquake photo showed a collapsed adobe home, with only the door frame remaining. However, in modern houses and buildings, doorways do not protect from flying debris or falling objects. You will be better protected under a table.
  • Resist the urge to run outside! Trying to run during an earthquake is dangerous, as the ground is moving and could cause you to fall or sustain injury due to flying debris, such as glass. Running outside is especially dangerous, as bricks and other building components could fall, injuring you or blocking your escape. Instead, stay inside and take cover under a desk or table.
  • Don’t ignore opportunities to prepare for earthquakes. Unlike other natural disasters such as hurricanes, earthquakes hit without warning. Nevertheless, by drilling, you can prepare so you know exactly what to do the next time a quake strikes.

About the Allied Universal Fire Life Safety Training System

Earthquake safety is important for everyone all year round, not just during the Great ShakeOut. A convenient and affordable way to make sure on-campus students or high-rise occupants are prepared for disasters and emergencies of virtually every kind is to subscribe to the Allied Universal Fire Life Safety Training System, which has been designed to help improve and save lives. For more information about the best system out there, or to subscribe, click here.

How to Prepare & Recover from Disasters

Tuesday, September 19th, 2017

Part 3 of a 3-part Series

As teachers, educators and administrators across the country welcome students to a new academic year, we want to help ensure your child starts 2017-2018 off right. School safety is of paramount importance since children spend more hours at school than anywhere besides their own homes. Facing myriad obstacles, such as transportation challenges, cyber bullying and peer pressure, and handling emergencies and disasters, students need to proactively take steps to #BeSafe.

The first entry of our three-part series about back-to-school safety focused on how to keep your child safe on the way to and from school. The second blog post focused on how to be safe while at school, relative to bullying. In the final post, we will cover the topic of how to be safe at school before, during and after emergencies or disasters. 

In an ironic twist, Hurricanes Harvey and Irma severely impacted the Gulf Coast, Florida and parts of the Caribbean during National Preparedness Month (NPM), whose theme is “Disasters Don’t Plan Ahead. You Can.” Projected to be the most expensive natural disasters of all time, the two storms are projected to cause losses in excess of $290 billion.

While some natural disasters are predictable, giving schools leeway to cancel classes and residents ample warning to evacuate, others can happen unexpectedly or rapidly change, suddenly putting students in danger. The first step to take in preparing for emergencies is to assess the types of natural or man-made disaster risks most likely to occur in your region:

  • Earthquakes
  • Extreme heat
  • Flooding
  • Hurricanes and tornadoes
  • Landslides and debris flow
  • Thunderstorms and lightning
  • Wildfires or structural fires
  • Winter storms and extreme cold

The sudden and unexpected nature of disasters means that you could be away from your child during a disaster. Without proper planning, this is a frightening prospect. Nevertheless, while there’s no substitute for being with your children when a disaster strikes, there are ways to lessen associated fears of what may happen if an emergency occurs while your student is at school:

  • Familiarize yourself with your district’s emergency preparedness plans. In fact, get involved in the planning process so you have input about campus procedures.
  • Find out your community’s risk and response plans. Involve your student. Kids like being included in the process, for their own safety and sense of empowerment.
  • Hold a meeting to discuss your family’s communications plan.
  • For younger students, roleplay what to do during a disaster.
  • After you’ve learned about the school’s and community’s emergency response plans, talk to your child about them, reminding your student about the importance of actively listening to teachers and administrators during emergencies.
  • Use age-appropriate preparedness materials to explain emergency procedures to your child. These could include engaging activities and easy action steps that your students will find both fun, informative and effective.
  • Work together to build an emergency kit. For college-aged students, as you plan for their practical needs during their months away from home, be sure to include some items that will come in handy in an emergency in addition to climate-appropriate clothing, dorm supplies, medications and toiletries. Whether it’s as simple as a power outage or as challenging as a storm like Hurricane Harvey or Tropical Storm Irma, being prepared can help your college student remain safe and deal calmly with the situation, while helping other classmates to do the same.
  • Check the district or college website to see if emergency plans are posted. If not, call administrators to request a copy of the plan and confirm that your student is registered with the emergency notification system.
  • The Allied Universal Fire Life Safety Training Program now features disaster training for students in on-campus housing.
  • Ready-made disaster kits designed for students can be ordered from the American Red Cross at redcrossstore.org. Information on compiling your own disaster readiness kit is available on the web at www.fema.gov.

About the Allied Universal Fire Life Safety Training System

Safety is important for everyone all year round, not just while at school. A convenient and affordable way to make sure on-campus students or high-rise occupants are prepared for disasters and emergencies of virtually every kind is to subscribe to the Allied Universal Fire Life Safety Training System, which has been designed to help improve and save lives. For more information about the best system out there, or to subscribe, click here.

Bullying and Peer Pressure: Be Safe at School

Tuesday, August 29th, 2017

Part 2 in a 3-Part Series 

As teachers and administrators across the country are welcoming students to a new school year, we want to help make sure your child starts 2017-2018 off right. Follow these simple safety steps, adapted from the National Crime Prevention Council (NCPC), which are important whether your student is just beginning his educational journey or is close to earning a degree.

School safety is of paramount importance since children spend more hours at school than anywhere besides their own homes. Facing myriad obstacles, such as bullying and peer pressure, and natural or manmade disasters, students now more than ever need to proactively take steps to #BeSafe. 

Our first entry focused on how to keep your child safe on the way to and from school. This week, we will cover how to be safe while at school, relative to bullying. To read part one, click here. Our final post will cover school safety before, during and after natural and manmade disasters.

Bullying

Although bullying was once considered standard procedure, parents, educators, and community leaders today recognize it as a devastating form of abuse that can have long-term repercussions – robbing students of self-esteem, isolating them from peers, and leading to health problems, curtailed education, and even suicide.

According to StopBullying.gov, the core elements of the definition include: “unwanted aggressive behavior; observed or perceived power imbalance; and repetition of behaviors or high likelihood of repetition.”

Bullying is now seen as gateway behavior, teaching perpetrators that threats and aggression are acceptable, even in adulthood. ABC News reports that one in every five middle and high school students has complained of being bullied at school. And reports of sexual assault on college campuses (which fit under the broader category of bullying) have more than tripled over the past decade. Most bullying takes place in school, outside on school grounds or on the school bus. Cyberbullying, which is a relatively new phenomenon, occurs via smartphones, social media and other computer applications.

Since bullying can threaten students’ physical and emotional safety at school and negatively impact their ability to learn, the best way to address bullying is to be proactive. Talking to your children about bullying will help them know how to respond if they are victims and will also keep them from becoming bullies.

  • Pay attention. Ask parents of your child’s friends and peers, teachers, guidance counselors, and the school principal if they see signs in your child of bullying or evidence that he is being bullied
  • Communicate. Keep the lines of communication open. Talk to your kids about relationships and pressures to fit in. Discuss what bully behavior looks like. Ask your child to pay attention not only to how she is treated but also to identify bullying of other children.
  • Stop it in its tracks. Don’t wait for bully-behavior to escalate before addressing it. If you suspect your child is a victim or perpetrator, act immediately. Let your child know that bullying is unacceptable and that serious consequences will be faced if the behavior is not checked at home, school, and in the community.
  • Teach respect. Regularly engage in dialogue with your child about maintaining a sense of empathy for people who are different. Consider getting involved in a community group where your child can interact with kids who are different. Make sure you remain a good example in your dealings with others.
  • Reward good behavior. Students sometimes bully to get attention. So, positive reinforcement can be more powerful than negative discipline. Catch your kids behaving well and when they handle situations in ways that are constructive or positive, take notice and shower them with praise.

Check back, as the final post in our three-part back-to-school safety series will focus on natural and manmade disasters.

About the Allied Universal Fire Life Safety Training System

Safety is important for everyone all year round, not just while at school. A convenient and affordable way to make sure high-rise occupants are prepared for disasters and emergencies of virtually every kind is to subscribe to the Allied Universal Fire Life Safety Training System, which has been designed to help improve and save lives. For more information about the best system out there, or to subscribe, click here.

Back-to-School Safety

Tuesday, August 15th, 2017

Part 1 in a 3-Part Series

As we close the book on summer 2017, teachers and administrators across the country welcome students to a school year that’s rife with opportunity and promise. To make sure your student starts 2017-2018 off right, follow these simple safety steps, which are important whether your child is just beginning his educational journey or is close to earning a degree. This week, our post focuses on how to keep your child safe on the way to and from school. Check back next week when we provide tips for being safe from bullying and the final post, which will cover how to be safe before, during and after natural and manmade disasters.  


Safety on the Way to School

Biking or Walking – Teach your students to:

  • Check with the school to make sure biking is allowed and that racks are provided so the bicycle can be safely stowed on arrival.
  • Wear a safe helmet, since helmets reduce the risk of head injury by as much as 85%.
  • Choose sidewalks or pathways wherever possible, even if using them lengthens the trip.
  • Travel as far from motor vehicles as possible. If sidewalks or designated paths are unavailable, students should walk on the side of the street facing traffic.
  • Look both ways before crossing the street, and not to talk to strangers.
  • Find a buddy so they won’t have to go it alone.
  • Follow directions of the crossing guard, if one is present.
  • Cross streets only at corners, at traffic signals or designated crosswalks.
  • Make eye contact with drivers before passing in front of motor vehicles.
  • Stay alert. Students should pay attention to cars that are backing up or turning.
  • Avoid running into the street or crossing between parked cars.
  • Wear retroreflective materials to make sure they can be seen.

Taking the Bus – Tell your students to:

  • Familiarize themselves with the bus stop.
  • Introduce themselves to the driver the first day of school.
  • Allow plenty of time to get to the bus stop.
  • Wait patiently at the stop and not to board or exit the vehicle until it comes to a complete stop.
  • Respect the driver as well as other students.

Safe Driving

Teen crashes spike in September as secondary kids head back to school. But the reasons for this may be surprising. Teenage drivers tend to crash not because they are careless but because they are inexperienced. They struggle when judging gaps in traffic, driving the right speed for road conditions and executing safe turns. What’s more:

  • 66% of teen passengers who die in a crash are not wearing a seat belt.
  • 58% of teens involved in crashes are distracted.
  • 25% of car crashes involve an underage drinking driver.
  • 5% of teens who die in crashes are pedestrians and 10% are bicyclists.

The National Safety Council campaign, “Drive It Home” focuses on the importance of ongoing parental instruction. Don’t end driver’s training as soon your child is licensed. Continue to mentor your young driver. Be sure to check back when we will cover part two in this three-part series, about bullying. Our final post in the series will cover safety before, during and after natural and manmade disasters.

About the Allied Universal Fire Life Safety Training System

Safety is important for everyone all year round, not just for students on their way to and from school. A convenient and affordable way to make sure high-rise occupants are prepared for disasters and emergencies of virtually every kind is to subscribe to the Allied Universal Fire Life Safety Training System, which has been designed to help improve and save lives. For more information about the best system out there, or to subscribe, click here.

Cyber Safety in College

Tuesday, February 21st, 2017

Part 3 of a 3-Part Series 

Attending college is a grand adventure, whether students choose to live on campus or commute. It also can prove risky for anyone who fails to sufficiently prepare for potential emergencies.

Campus Safety Recap

In our ongoing effort to save lives through training, the Allied Universal Fire Life Training System is expanding our online safety education to include residence hall fire life safety. Using building-specific information, students living in campus housing who attend subscribing universities will be able to log in to modules designed to train them to be safe, whether they live in a residence hall, traditional or suite-style residence, on or off campus. To help college students stay safe while attending college, we are doing a three-part blog series about campus safety.

Password protection is crucial to cyber security.

In part one, we offered helpful tips for keeping students safe relative to fire. Part two focused on personal safety while in college. For this final entry, we cover college safety relative to cyber security.

Cyber Safety

Each year, college IT departments deal with hundreds or thousands of new and returning students who show up with laptops, desktops, smartphones and tablets—all of which need to connect to the campus network. This is a scary proposition where online security is concerned, so students should prepare to eliminate risks, both for their own safety as well as that of their college.

Most college students today are infinitely more familiar with computer equipment than most of their parents and grandparents. Unfortunately, this familiarity can breed contempt, as most assume that cybercrime happens to other, less computer-savvy people. In fact, they are often referred to as “the click generation,” because they are so quick to click on website links and social media before considering the consequences. Another habit that puts them and their computers at risk is the sheer number of hours they spend online.

Cyber The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) has an aggressive cyber security branch, which focuses on cyberspace and its underlying infrastructure, both of which are vulnerable to a wide range of risk—stemming from both physical and cyber threats and hazards. Sophisticated cyber actors and nation-states exploit vulnerabilities to steal information and money and are developing capabilities to disrupt, destroy, or threaten the delivery of essential services. The DHS current cyber security campaign, Stop. Think. Connect encourages Internet users of all ages to take responsibility for their own cyber safety.

Here are five tips to follow, to help keep college kids cyber safe:

  1. Keep a Clean Machine—Utilize malware software. Run regular security scans. Scan every device before inserting into a computer. Think twice before inserting an unknown flash drive into any computer. Not only should the source who provided the flash drive be trustworthy, but his or her cyber habits should be beyond reproach.
  2. Protect Personal Info—Secure accounts with strong passwords. Change passwords often. Don’t write them on Post-it notes placed next to the machine. Set stringent security protocols on laptops, tablets, phones and desktop computers. Hackers and identity thieves can only access information provided over the Web. Stick to online activity that doesn’t require full name or contact information unless you are using a trusted site for online purchases, such as PayPal, eBay or and Amazon. Be skeptical of an unknown site that asks for email, credit card number or home address.
  3. Connect with Care—Refrain from clicking hyperlinks sent in emails. Avoid doing anything of a personal nature while using a public hotspot. Make sure connections are secure (encrypted) whenever doing online banking or paying bills. And even while using a trusted social media platform, avoid revealing items of a personal nature such as school name, favorite hangout spot, and make/model of your car.
  4. Be Web Wise—If something seems too good to be true, it probably is. Students should think twice before ordering online from an unknown vendor. Trust your gut. Use only trusted websites. Keep abreast of known Internet threats. Think before typing or clicking.
  5. Be a Good Online Citizen—Apply the *Golden Rule to everything done online. Help fight cybercrime by reporting anything unusual to the Department of Homeland Security .
  6. Check your school’s systems. Students should also contact campus safety department and IT department for best practices and tips recommended for their specific institution’s systems.

*Do unto others as you would have done to you.

Remember that safety in the 3D world, as well as cyberspace, is a priority for everyone all year long. A convenient and affordable way to make sure you are prepared for disasters and emergencies of virtually every kind is to subscribe to the Allied Universal Fire Life Training System, which has been designed to help improve and save lives. For more information about the best system out there, or to subscribe, click here.

Personal Safety at College

Tuesday, February 7th, 2017

Part 2 of a 3-Part Series

Attending college is a grand adventure, whether students choose to live on campus or commute. It also can prove risky for anyone who fails to sufficiently prepare for potential emergencies. In our ongoing effort to save lives through training, the Allied Universal Fire Life Training System is expanding our online safety education to include residence hall fire life safety.

Using building-specific information, students living in campus housing who attend subscribing universities will be able to log in to modules designed to train them to be safe, whether they live in a residence hall, traditional or suite-style residence, on or off campus. To help college students stay safe while attending college, we are doing a three-part blog series about campus safety.

Blog Series

In part one, we offered helpful tips for keeping students safe relative to fire. This week’s post will focus on personal safety while in college. Check back next week to read about college safety relative to cyber security.

Be Aware

One of the most important ways to #BeSafe while in college is to make sure that students are aware of potential threats to their personal safety. A recent report by CBS News says that the top nine threats to today’s university students include:

  1. Mononucleosis
  2. Meningitis
  3. Colds and flu
  4. Hazardous mold
  5. Bedbugs
  6. Athlete’s foot
  7. Sleep deprivation
  8. Binge drinking
  9. Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs)

Safety Concerns

While we agree that the above are concerns, we suggest there are even more menacing threats to the typical college student’s safety. Whether students are walking on campus to go to a class, headed to the library, or on their way to a dorm, they should take steps to be safe:

  • Lock the residence when leaving or sleeping.
  • At night, walk in groups of at least two.
  • Familiarize themselves with services provided by the office of campus safety. Potential services could include Blue Light emergency phone stations, campus escort services, safety maps with suggested secure routes and support for a safety app like Campus Safety.
  • After dark, walk only on lit sidewalks.
  • Know where you are going.
  • When parking, remove valuables from plain view and lock vehicles.
  • Record serial numbers for valuables and store them in a safe place.
  • Report criminal incidents, losses and suspicious people to campus safety officers.
  • Learn how to defend yourself.
  • Maintain ready access to safety and security supplies.
  • Dial 911 for life-threatening emergencies.

It is also imperative that students, as well as their friends, family members, and neighbors know how to properly respond and support someone who reports a crime to them in confidence. Victims and loved ones should know where to turn for resources and resolution.

Resources are available for males and females as well as non-victims:

Next week, check back to read our final post in this series about college safety. Remember that safety is a priority for everyone all year long. A convenient and affordable way to make sure you are prepared for disasters and emergencies of virtually every kind is to subscribe to the Allied Universal Fire Life Training System, which has been designed to help improve and save lives. For more information about the best system out there, or to subscribe, click here.