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Bullying and Peer Pressure: Be Safe at School

Tuesday, August 29th, 2017

Part 2 in a 3-Part Series 

As teachers and administrators across the country are welcoming students to a new school year, we want to help make sure your child starts 2017-2018 off right. Follow these simple safety steps, adapted from the National Crime Prevention Council (NCPC), which are important whether your student is just beginning his educational journey or is close to earning a degree.

School safety is of paramount importance since children spend more hours at school than anywhere besides their own homes. Facing myriad obstacles, such as bullying and peer pressure, and natural or manmade disasters, students now more than ever need to proactively take steps to #BeSafe. 

Our first entry focused on how to keep your child safe on the way to and from school. This week, we will cover how to be safe while at school, relative to bullying. To read part one, click here. Our final post will cover school safety before, during and after natural and manmade disasters.

Bullying

Although bullying was once considered standard procedure, parents, educators, and community leaders today recognize it as a devastating form of abuse that can have long-term repercussions – robbing students of self-esteem, isolating them from peers, and leading to health problems, curtailed education, and even suicide.

According to StopBullying.gov, the core elements of the definition include: “unwanted aggressive behavior; observed or perceived power imbalance; and repetition of behaviors or high likelihood of repetition.”

Bullying is now seen as gateway behavior, teaching perpetrators that threats and aggression are acceptable, even in adulthood. ABC News reports that one in every five middle and high school students has complained of being bullied at school. And reports of sexual assault on college campuses (which fit under the broader category of bullying) have more than tripled over the past decade. Most bullying takes place in school, outside on school grounds or on the school bus. Cyberbullying, which is a relatively new phenomenon, occurs via smartphones, social media and other computer applications.

Since bullying can threaten students’ physical and emotional safety at school and negatively impact their ability to learn, the best way to address bullying is to be proactive. Talking to your children about bullying will help them know how to respond if they are victims and will also keep them from becoming bullies.

  • Pay attention. Ask parents of your child’s friends and peers, teachers, guidance counselors, and the school principal if they see signs in your child of bullying or evidence that he is being bullied
  • Communicate. Keep the lines of communication open. Talk to your kids about relationships and pressures to fit in. Discuss what bully behavior looks like. Ask your child to pay attention not only to how she is treated but also to identify bullying of other children.
  • Stop it in its tracks. Don’t wait for bully-behavior to escalate before addressing it. If you suspect your child is a victim or perpetrator, act immediately. Let your child know that bullying is unacceptable and that serious consequences will be faced if the behavior is not checked at home, school, and in the community.
  • Teach respect. Regularly engage in dialogue with your child about maintaining a sense of empathy for people who are different. Consider getting involved in a community group where your child can interact with kids who are different. Make sure you remain a good example in your dealings with others.
  • Reward good behavior. Students sometimes bully to get attention. So, positive reinforcement can be more powerful than negative discipline. Catch your kids behaving well and when they handle situations in ways that are constructive or positive, take notice and shower them with praise.

Check back, as the final post in our three-part back-to-school safety series will focus on natural and manmade disasters.

About the Allied Universal Fire Life Safety Training System

Safety is important for everyone all year round, not just while at school. A convenient and affordable way to make sure high-rise occupants are prepared for disasters and emergencies of virtually every kind is to subscribe to the Allied Universal Fire Life Safety Training System, which has been designed to help improve and save lives. For more information about the best system out there, or to subscribe, click here.

Back-to-School Safety

Tuesday, August 15th, 2017

Part 1 in a 3-Part Series

As we close the book on summer 2017, teachers and administrators across the country welcome students to a school year that’s rife with opportunity and promise. To make sure your student starts 2017-2018 off right, follow these simple safety steps, which are important whether your child is just beginning his educational journey or is close to earning a degree. This week, our post focuses on how to keep your child safe on the way to and from school. Check back next week when we provide tips for being safe from bullying and the final post, which will cover how to be safe before, during and after natural and manmade disasters.  


Safety on the Way to School

Biking or Walking – Teach your students to:

  • Check with the school to make sure biking is allowed and that racks are provided so the bicycle can be safely stowed on arrival.
  • Wear a safe helmet, since helmets reduce the risk of head injury by as much as 85%.
  • Choose sidewalks or pathways wherever possible, even if using them lengthens the trip.
  • Travel as far from motor vehicles as possible. If sidewalks or designated paths are unavailable, students should walk on the side of the street facing traffic.
  • Look both ways before crossing the street, and not to talk to strangers.
  • Find a buddy so they won’t have to go it alone.
  • Follow directions of the crossing guard, if one is present.
  • Cross streets only at corners, at traffic signals or designated crosswalks.
  • Make eye contact with drivers before passing in front of motor vehicles.
  • Stay alert. Students should pay attention to cars that are backing up or turning.
  • Avoid running into the street or crossing between parked cars.
  • Wear retroreflective materials to make sure they can be seen.

Taking the Bus – Tell your students to:

  • Familiarize themselves with the bus stop.
  • Introduce themselves to the driver the first day of school.
  • Allow plenty of time to get to the bus stop.
  • Wait patiently at the stop and not to board or exit the vehicle until it comes to a complete stop.
  • Respect the driver as well as other students.

Safe Driving

Teen crashes spike in September as secondary kids head back to school. But the reasons for this may be surprising. Teenage drivers tend to crash not because they are careless but because they are inexperienced. They struggle when judging gaps in traffic, driving the right speed for road conditions and executing safe turns. What’s more:

  • 66% of teen passengers who die in a crash are not wearing a seat belt.
  • 58% of teens involved in crashes are distracted.
  • 25% of car crashes involve an underage drinking driver.
  • 5% of teens who die in crashes are pedestrians and 10% are bicyclists.

The National Safety Council campaign, “Drive It Home” focuses on the importance of ongoing parental instruction. Don’t end driver’s training as soon your child is licensed. Continue to mentor your young driver. Be sure to check back when we will cover part two in this three-part series, about bullying. Our final post in the series will cover safety before, during and after natural and manmade disasters.

About the Allied Universal Fire Life Safety Training System

Safety is important for everyone all year round, not just for students on their way to and from school. A convenient and affordable way to make sure high-rise occupants are prepared for disasters and emergencies of virtually every kind is to subscribe to the Allied Universal Fire Life Safety Training System, which has been designed to help improve and save lives. For more information about the best system out there, or to subscribe, click here.

What’s in the Water?

Tuesday, July 5th, 2016

Identifying the Danger of Algae and other Contaminants

Kid sick in the hospitalAccording to UNICEF, in 2015, nine percent of every child deaths, worldwide, resulted from illnesses caused by toxic water. Poor water quality contributes directly to life-threatening ailments as common, but potentially, deadly as diarrhea to as rare and dangerous as malaria and schistosomiasis. Thankfully, in most parts of the U.S., the water supply is exceedingly clean — espe

cially when compared to what’s available in developing countries. Nevertheless, United States’ officials are becoming increasingly concerned about the presence of toxic algae in dozens of areas in the Midwest. In Flint Michigan, for example, poor water supply (and mismanagement of the same) has caused serious health problems for residents, as well as massive political fallout.

researcher testing the water qualityAlgae in a Nutshell

  • Present in all bodies of water, algae plays an important role as a building block in the food chain.
  • Functions as a carbon sink, which pulls excess CO2 from the air, reducing the risk of climate change.
  • Blooms are outsized algae growths which often occur due to increased temperatures, as well as fertilizer and wastewater runoff.  The most dangerous kind of algae is cyanobacteria, otherwise known as blue-green algae. This type is toxic to animals and humans.

How Algae Affects Humans

Algal Blooms

Algal Blooms

The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), has recently noted an alarming rise in incidences of algal blooms in drinking water reservoirs. They identify golden alga (Prymnesium parvum) as a frequent culprit relative to algal blooms, which include those which have affected Lake Erie in the recent past. Steps taken to mitigate the problem include better monitoring, and, in the case of Lake Erie, an ongoing effort to minimize farm runoff — which has contributed directly to the algal bloom.

Sometimes, large geographical regions can be affected. For example, in 2014, the entire city of Toledo, Ohio, had to stop drinking tap water due to the presence of Cyanobacteria. More than 500,000 residents were impacted, including thousands of business owners who had to think quickly in order to provide alternative drinking sources for staff and visitors. Since Cyanobacteria are not killed by boiling, the only viable solution is to use bottChemical element Arsenic Flatled water during an algae-related water supply crisis.

To combat algal blooms, the water source must be treated. This includes restricting usage of fertilizers and other agricultural runoff sources, adding phosphorous, suction dredging, and wetlands conservation.

Other Common Water Contaminants
Beyond algal blooms, there are myriad other water contaminants that must be properly monitored and treated.

Consider the following:

  • Lead seepage was the main problem relative to the drinking water crisis in Flint. This is typically caused by corroded lead pipes which leech contaminants into the water supply, over time. Lead is exceedingly toxic, especially for children, and causes damage to the nervous and reproductive systems, and compromises brain development.
  • Arsenic is another common contaminant typically found in private wells, as it is found in the earth’s crust. Detrimental health effects include cancers of the bladder, kidney, and skin, as well as blood vessel diseases.
  • The EPA lists dozens of other potential contaminants including cleaning supplies, medications, and various other organic and inorganic substances.

Ensuring the safety and availability of drinking water during a crisis requires diligent monitoring of water quality alerts and preparation of emergency supply kits containing sufficient stores of potable water. So remember to take proper disaster preparation steps and remember that safety is a daily priority. A convenient and affordable way to make sure you are prepared for disasters and emergencies of virtually every kind is to subscribe to the Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services, which has been designed to help improve and save lives. For more information about the best system out there, or to subscribe, click here.

5 Summer Water Safety Tips

Tuesday, June 14th, 2016

Drowning business manAccording to the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), about 10 people die from unintentionally drowning each day in the United States. In fact, drowning is the fifth leading cause of unintentional death for people of all ages, and is the second leading cause of injury death for children ages 1 to 14 years in the nation. Globally, the statistics provided by the World Health Organization are scarier yet, with more than 40 people dying by drowning every hour of every day! But the good news is that accidental drownings are preventable as long as you observe a few safety guidelines whenever you are in or around water this summer.

Wherever you choose to vacation this summer, #BeSafe and #SafeForLife:

  1. Steady on your feet. Even if you opt for a “stay-cation” this year, be careful not just in, but around water. This includes areas adjacent to man-made water sources such as the wooden decking around Jacuzzis and spas as well as slick surfaces like freshly watered lawns or pool decks. Slip-and-fall accidents account for a myriad of serious and even life-threatening injuries each year, especially among senior citizens. So instruct children to walk instead of run and help elderly people when they are walking in slippery areas.
  2. Easy does it. Alcohol and water do not mix. If and when you choose to indulge over the summer, do so when you are clear of water-related dangers. The American Boating Association reports that almost half of all boating accidents involve alcohol. So an easy way to reduce your risk of a boating accident is to stay sober whenever you get behind the water wheel. sunset postcard
  3. Start early. Teach children water safety and swimming skills as early as possible. Even babies can learn basic water survival techniques. Be sure to include swimming lessons in your summer routine. And whenever young kids are around a pool, watch them like a hawk and brief babysitters about the necessity of providing constant supervision around water.
  4. Make rescue easy. If you have an above-ground or in-ground pool, live near a dock or have a hot tub, post CPR instructions near the water. Also, learn emergency lifesaving procedures so you can provide aid when necessary, while waiting for first responders. Also, make sure a phone is always on hand whenever anyone is in the water. And stow rescue equipment as close to the water as possible. When it comes to drowning, every second counts.
    First aid
  5. Discourage accidents. Install proper barriers, covers and alarms on and around your pool and spa. Also, teach your kids to stay away from drains. Tips at Gov point out that children’s hair, limbs, jewelry or bathing suits could potentially get stuck in a drain or suction opening. Also, make sure that all pools and spas (including those in backyards as well as in public areas) have compliant drain covers. And if your pool is not covered, remove bright colored toys or flotation devices from the surface, since these attract curious kids.Bright beach ball in the water

Be sure to think about ways to #BeSafe all of the time, not just when you are enjoying the water. A convenient and affordable way to make sure you are prepared for disasters and emergencies of virtually every kind is to subscribe to the Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services, which has been designed to help improve and save lives. For more information about the best system out there, or to subscribe, click here.

June is National Safety Month

Tuesday, June 7th, 2016

Safety First and AlwaysOn the heels of celebrating National Building Safety Month in May, we feel it equally essential to note that June marks a more general but no less important annual observance – National Safety Month. Organized by the National Safety Council (NSC) and observed by thousands of organizations across the country, the campaign is designed to raise awareness about what it takes to stay #SafeForLife. National Safety Month focuses on reducing leading causes of injury and death at work, on the roads, as well as in private homes and communities. Each week in June, the NSC will provide free downloadable resources highlighting a specific safety topic. Many of the items are available in English and Spanish.

Week 1 (Through June 12)

Stand Ready to Respond

Lifetime of Risk InfographWhen seconds count, preparation is key. This is true in both natural and man-made disasters. To prepare, keep a fully stocked emergency preparedness kit in your home and vehicle. Be sure to include supplies such as food, water, necessary medications, a battery-powered radio, a flashlight and a first aid kit. And, just as you participate in emergency drills at work, run regular drills with your family.

Resources available through the NSC

Week 2 (June 13 – 19)

Be Healthy

Each day, decisions we make directly impact our health. So do your best to make smart food choices and exercise regularly. When an injury occurs, strive to work with your doctor to safeguard your health by making informed decisions about what types of medications to take. Keep young children safe around medications by properly storing medicines and vitamins away and out of a child’s reach.

Resources available through the NSC

Week 3 (June 20-26)

Watch Out for Dangers

Although, in a recent Allied Universal Training System blog post, we covered the importance of situational awareness, the topic is important enough to bear repeating. Even in familiar surroundings, constantly survey your surroundings for potential danger. Keeping an eye out for hazards can help you identify and avoid them before an injury or attack might occur. Looking at the world through this safety lens can help protect you and loved ones.

National Safety Month Logo 2016Resources available through the NSC

Week 4 (June 27-30)

Share Roads Safely

Vehicles traveling or disabled along our nation’s roadways are constantly at risk. Since it’s impossible to control the choices everyone makes while on the road, practice defensive driving. Getting behind the wheel is a time for patience and focus, qualities that can help you avoid a collision even if someone else makes a bad decision.

Resources available through the NSCNational Safety Council

Be sure to think about ways to use situational awareness to #BeSafe all of the time, not just during the month of June. A convenient and affordable way to make sure you are prepared for disasters and emergencies of virtually every kind is to subscribe to the Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services, which has been designed to help improve and save lives. For more information about the best system out there, or to subscribe, click here.

Holiday Cooking Safety Tips

Wednesday, December 23rd, 2015

Woman preparing for Christmas dinnerCooking a big meal for the holidays is a joyous event, as you can pour your love and expertise into every bite. But to keep loved ones safe, make sure you are careful in the kitchen. Our first tip? Slow down. Despite the frenetic pace modeled on cooking competition shows, it’s always best to pace yourself while cooking. Professional chefs work quickly, but they also watch out for one another and take steps to follow basic safety protocols.

Avoid Food-Borne Illnesses

As disheartening as it is, in terms of bacteria, home kitchens are typically more bacteria-ridden than public restrooms.  But the good news is that if steps are taken to follow sanitary practices, you can guard against hosting a house full of sick holiday guests.Dirty utensil on the kitchen

  • Wash utensils thoroughly. The dishwasher is the best method for washing, as it utilizes too-hot-to-handle water and vigorous rinsing. If you must hand wash items that have come into contact with raw meat or eggs, use gloves, so you can handle hot water without burning yourself. Apply lots of soap and thoroughly wash everything to dispense with soap residue.
  • Prevent cross contamination by using separate cutting boards for meat, veggies and fruit. Several manufacturers offer color-coded cutting boards for just this reason.
  • User paper towels to remove juice from meat and raw eggs. Avoid using cloth towels, which can harbor bacteria.
  • Defrost and marinate foods in the refrigerator instead of on top of the kitchen counter or in the sink.

messyPrevent Kitchen Fires

  • Focus on the task at hand. Do not leave items on the stove and then leave to fold laundry or watch TV. Instead, remain in the kitchen so you can quickly control any flare-ups.
  • Remove clutter. If you are cooking an elaborate meal, clean up as you go to keep your workspace clutter free. Towels or wooden utensils are highly flammable, so keep a “clear zone” around the range top and oven.
  • Thoroughly clean cooking surfaces to prevent high-fat food residue buildup, which can be flammable.
  • Be careful if you are frying foods. Remember that water and hot oil are incompatible. So don’t put frozen foods into hot oil.
  • Keep a fire extinguisher in the kitchen to put out fires before they get out of control. Make sure you are using the right type of extinguisher for the fire you are battling. If you need to use it, remember the acronym PASS – pull, aim, squeeze and sweep.

Additional tips for holiday kitchen safety:

  • Monitor the kids. Keep children out of the kitchen during meal preparation. While you might be able to supervise kids in less hectic times, crowded kitchens and lots of activity can lead to accidents. So save culinary lessons for after the holidays. Also, keeping children away from meal preparation will prevent curious little hands from pulling on pot handles.Overwhelmed and frustrated Mom in the kitchen
  • Clean up spills. A slippery floor is a major hazard in the kitchen, since people often carry sharp knives and boiling water. So immediately wipe spills until surfaces are completely dry.
  • Use knives properly. There is a proper way to chop different types of foods, which can prevent the loss of a fingertip and a trip to the emergency room on Christmas Day. In addition, remember that, as counter intuitive as it sounds, it is safer to use a razor sharp knife than a dull blade.
  • Steam burns. Some foods, such as instant rice and veggies, now come in convenient plastic microwaveable packets. If you decide to use these, make sure to open away from your face.

The holidays are a busy time. Adding several relatives and planning big elaborate meals challenge even the most organized host. So follow these kitchen safety practices to ensure everyone has a happy and safe holiday season.

Remember that safety is a daily priority, so be sure to think safety all of the time. A convenient and affordable way to make sure you are prepared for disasters and emergencies of virtually every kind is to subscribe to the Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services, which has been designed to help improve and save lives. For more information about the best system out there, or to subscribe, click here.

National Safe Toys and Gifts Month

Wednesday, December 9th, 2015

Plastic building blocksDecember is National Safe Toys and Gifts Month, so designated by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), to raise awareness about potentially hazardous toys. Since toy purchases are at an all-time high during the holidays, we thought it a good idea to highlight the campaign with this week’s blog post.

Part of the CPSC initiatives include third-party testing laboratories which check toys for lead and phthalate limits, so they can identify dangerous toys before they reach consumer shelves. The commission also produces safety alerts. For example, one highlights the choking hazards of plastic film coverings that are on many toys.

girl on scooterTypes of toys to avoid this holiday season:

  • Scooters and similar riding toys. Since the popular Razor Scooter’s launch in 2000, there has been a sharp increase in ER visits due to falls associated with the toys. Avoid giving these types of toys as gifts, since they lead to numerous serious accidents every year—especially when operated without a helmet. If you do buy a scooter, be sure to include a properly-fitted helmet, as well.
  • Toys with small parts. Pay attention to the warning labels on toy boxes, because they provide guidelines relative to choking hazards as well as age-appropriateness. Lego sets and other similar toys are fun, but they don’t work for toddlers, since the kits come with lots of small choking hazards. A good rule of thumb is to place or imagine the toy-part-in-question fitting inside a toilet paper roll. If it fits, then it’s too small.
  • Toys that could cause eye injuries. Toy guns that shoot pellets or Nerf darts are fun, but are a leading cause of injury, with studies showing a significant increase in the eye injuries resulting from toy parts over the past few years. For example, the “Airsoft” brand of guns led to a significant number of injuries and should only be used with eye protection.

Portrait.Keep little ones safe during the holidays:

The holiday season is a hectic time, which means adult attention spans can be stretched to the limit. Keeping track of babies and toddlers can be especially difficult during family gatherings and other festive events. Here are some tips for protecting your youngest family members at large functions:

  • Dispose of wrapping paper and plastic packaging. Toy packaging contains various types of plastic covers, twist ties, and other bits and pieces. All of these are potential chewing and choking hazard for babies and toddlers. Whenever possible, collect and recycle materials as presents are opened.
  • Keep an eye on the fireplace. Hanukkah nights or Christmas morning are both great times for a cozy fire. But flammable materials should be handled responsibly. Keep them far from flames. And, because kids are curious, be sure your fireplace screen is sturdy. This is also a great time to talk to children about the serious dangers posed by fire.Christmas Fireplace Hearth with Wreath and Stockings
  • Watch your plants. Mistletoe and holly are poisonous if ingested, so keep toxic plants out of the reach of young children.

    Many Christmas plants are beautiful, but toxic.

    Many Christmas plants are beautiful, but toxic.

  • Be careful with alcoholic beverages. If you and guests are enjoying a few cocktails during a holiday party, take steps to keep drinks out of the hands of anyone under the age of 21. Children imitate parents. So make sure they can’t reach unattended beverages. Ask guests to remove empty and even partially-empty cups.
  • Carefully string Christmas tree lights. Toddlers and babies love the glow of lights. So keep strands high on the tree to make sure they are out of reach of tiny fingers. Glass ornaments are another potential hazard which should be replaced, moved to a higher location or boxed until children are old enough to ensure their safety.

Remember that safety is a daily priority, so be sure to think safety all of the time. A convenient and affordable way to make sure you are prepared for disasters and emergencies of virtually every kind is to subscribe to the Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services, which has been designed to help improve and save lives. For more information about the best system out there, or to subscribe, click here.

Summer Safety: Stay Safe in the Water

Tuesday, August 4th, 2015

duck drowned - failure and SOS concept

Part 3 of a 3-part Series about Summer Safety

This summer, whether you plan to enjoy a stay-cation or leave your house for a short or extended period of time, there are several safety-related things to consider. The first two entries in our three-part series covered safety at home and safety while traveling. In this final post about summer safety, we will focus on how to be water safe.

According to the American Red Cross, more than 200 young children drown in backyard swimming pools in the United States each year. The six most common causes of drowning include:

  1. Inability to swim
  2. Absence of barriers to prevent unsupervised water access
  3. Lack of close supervision of non-swimmers and/or weak swimmers
  4. Omission of life jackets
  5. Use of alcohol
  6. Seizure-related disorders

Drowning is as significant a concern in oceans as it is in home and public swimming pools and hot tubs. The United States Lifesaving Association (USLA) says the major causes of ocean-related accidents are weather-related swells and rip currents. In 2014, there were:

  • 90,964 swimmers rescued near U.S. beaches
  • 4,225 boat rescues and 5,240 boat assistsRed lifebuoy hanging on railings of safety rescue boat
  • 7,652,479 preventive actions
  • 341,143 medical aid incidents
  • 93 unguarded drownings
  • 19 guarded drownings
  • 35 other water-related fatalities

So, this summer, take steps to make water safety a priority:

  • Swim only in designated areas supervised by lifeguards.
  • Swim with a buddy. Never swim alone.
  • Make sure that everyone in your family knows how to swim well. Enroll your kids in age-appropriate classes.
  • Never leave a young child unattended near water.
  • Do not trust your child’s life to someone else.
  • Have young children or inexperienced swimmers wear U.S. Coast Guard-approved life jackets around water. Water wings are insufficient to prevent drowning.
  • Do not rely on life jackets, alone.
  • Set firm rules for your family members. Make sure children always ask permission before going near the water.
  • Always be cautious around natural bodies of water—even if you do not intend to swim.
  • If you go boating, wear a life jacket! Most boating fatalities occur from drowning.
  • Water and alcohol do not mix. Alcohol impairs judgment, balance and coordination; affects swimming and diving skills; and reduces the body’s ability to stay warm.

Prevent Unsupervised Access to the Water

  • For safety as well as reduced risk of liability, install and use barriers around your home pool or hot tub.
  • Use pool barriers that enclose the entire pool area, with 4-feet high fences and self-closing gates. Install self-latching gates that open outward, away from the pool. Latches should be high enough to remain well out of reach for a small child.
  • Take safety precautions for above-ground and even inflatable pools. Remove access ladders when not in use and cover whenever the pool is not in use.
  • Store or distance anything that could potentially provide access to a pool, such as outdoor furniture, trees, walls or swing-sets.

Maintain Constant Supervision

  • Actively supervise kids whenever they are around water. Don’t rely on a lifeguard or other swimmers or sunbathers to supervise your kids.
  • Stay within arm’s reach of young children.
  • Avoid distractions when supervising children around water.

What to do in an Actual Emergency

  1. If a child is missing, check the water first. Seconds count in preventing death or disability.
  2. Call 911.
  3. If you own a home pool or hot tub, make sure you have easy access to appropriate equipment, such as reaching or throwing equipment, a cell phone, life jackets and a first aid kit.

The smartest thing to do is to prepare well in advance of any actual emergency. Enroll in water safety, first aid or CPR/AED courses to learn how to prevent and respond to emergencies. We hope this blog post will motivate you to do whatever it takes this summer to #BeSafe in and around the water. A convenient and affordable way to make sure you are prepared for disasters and emergencies of virtually every kind is to subscribe to the Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services, which has been designed to help improve and save lives.

National Child Abuse Prevention Month

Tuesday, April 7th, 2015

child abuse 2April is National Child Abuse Prevention Month. And, since we at the Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services value safety, we thought it pertinent to highlight the importance for people in all walks of life to value child advocacy. In other words, child advocacy is not limited to parents. With the motto, “We All Can Play a Part in Making Meaningful Connections,” this year’s campaign is designed to ensure that parents, friends, teachers and neighbors have the knowledge, skills, and resources they need to make sure children are being cared for.

Each year, more than three million reports of child abuse are made in the United States, involving more than six million children (some reports include multiple children). The United States has one of the worst records among industrialized nations – losing average between four and seven children every day to child abuse and neglect.

According to a landmark study done by the CDC/Kaiser Permanente Adverse Childhood Experiences, the breakdown of child abuse includes the following category and associated percentage of prevalence in the U.S.:

  • Physical Abuse – 28.3%
  • Sexual Abuse – 20.7%Child Abuse 1
  • Emotional Abuse – 10.6%
  • Physical Neglect – 9.9%
  • Emotional Neglect – 14.8%

Where abuse is involved, children suffer the risk of mental health disorders, addictions and related issues which include (but are not limited to) risk for intimate partner violence, alcoholism and substance abuse, smoking and drinking at an early age, depression and suicide attempts. The good news is that we can help eliminate the above and promote children’s social and emotional well-being by preventing child maltreatment within families and communities. Research shows that when parents possess six protective factors, the risk for neglect and abuse diminish and optimal outcomes for children, youth, and families are promoted.

The six protective factors include:

widget2April is a time to celebrate the important role that communities play in protecting children, so comprehensive participation is critical. This can be achieved by focusing on ways to build and promote protective factors in every interaction with children and families. In fact, this is the best thing any community can do to prevent child maltreatment and promote optimal child development. In support of these efforts, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Children’s Bureau, Office on Child Abuse and Neglect, its Child Welfare Information Gateway, the FRIENDS National Resource Center for Community-Based Child Abuse Prevention, and the Center for the Study of Social Policy – Strengthening Families together have created Making Meaningful Connections 2015 Resource Guide. The guide is designed for service providers who work throughout the community to strengthen families, and is available on the Information Gateway website.

We hope that this blog post will help you take steps to keep children safe during National Child Abuse Prevention Month and all year long. A convenient and affordable way to make sure you are prepared for disasters and emergencies of virtually every kind is to subscribe to the Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services, which has been designed to help improve and save lives. Visit rjwestmore.com to read about the many ways proper planning can make a difference in numerous aspects of your professional and personal life.

Enterovirus 68 What You Should Know

Tuesday, November 4th, 2014

?????????????????? Massive media coverage about Ebola has effectively buried attention about an infection that is far more widespread: Enterovirus D68 (EV-D68). One of more than 100 non-polio Enteroviruses, EV-D68 was first identified in California in 1962, and belongs to a large family of viruses that cause an estimated 10 million to 15 million infections in Americans every year. In an alert distributed by the World Health Organization (WHO), as of September 16, 2014, 130 laboratory-confirmed cases of EV-D68 have been reported in 12 U.S. states, including Alabama, Colorado, Illinois, Indiana, Iowa, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Missouri, New York, Oklahoma, and Pennsylvania. Investigations into suspected clusters in many other states are ongoing.

Since that time, NBC News reports that two California children have died from symptoms associated with the virus. In general, infants, children, and teenagers are most likely to get infected with Enteroviruses and become ill because they do not yet have immunity from previous exposures to these viruses. The same is true for adults, although they are less likely than children to exhibit symptoms.

Diagnosed through lab tests, the virus is located in infected respiratory secretions, such as saliva, nasal mucus, or sputum, and likely spreads from person to person when an infected person’s coughs, sneezes, or body parts touch a surface that is later touched by others. According to Live Science, on average, people touch their faces 3.3 times per hour.

Symptoms of EV-D68 infection – Most people who are infected with non-polio Enteroviruses do not get sick, or they experience only mild illness. According to the CDC, these are the symptoms associated with Enterovirus, from mild to severe to unusual:

Mild Symptoms:

  • Mild to severe respiratory illness
  • Fever
  • Runny nose
  • Sneezing
  • Cough
  • Body and muscle aches

Severe symptoms:

  • Wheezing
  • Difficulty breathing, especially in children who have asthma
  • Skin rash
  • Mouth blisters

Less common symptoms:

  • Myocarditis (infection of the heart)
  • Pericarditis (infection of the sac around the heart)
  • Encephalitis (infection of the brain)
  • Paralysis

Rare symptoms:

Although no anti-viral medications have been approved for use with EV-D68, people with respiratory illness associated with the virus should discuss symptomatic treatment options with their doctors. People with severe respiratory illness may need to be hospitalized.

Five Steps to Take to Avoid Enterovirus

  1. Wash your hands often, with soap and water, for at least 20 seconds.
  2. Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth with unwashed hands. Avoid close contact such as kissing, hugging, and sharing cups or eating utensils with people who are sick.
  3. Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue or shirt sleeve, not your hands.
  4. Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces, such as toys and doorknobs, especially if someone is sick.
  5. Stay home when you are sick.

CDC Enterovirus InfographicWe hope that this blog post will help inform you about ways to #BESAFE in light of Enterovirus as well as other, more widespread health concerns such as influenza and the common cold. The Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services is a convenient and affordable solution to helping improve and save lives. Visit our website for ways proper planning can make a difference in numerous aspects of your professional and personal life.