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Patriot Day 2014

Tuesday, September 9th, 2014

911 2014What is Patriot Day?

On September 11, 2001, four planes were hijacked by terrorists who deliberately flew three of the planes into the Pentagon in Washington D.C. and both of the Twin Towers of the World Trade Center in New York City. The fourth plane crashed into a field near Shanksville, Pennsylvania. The loss of life and damage that these hijackings caused remain the largest act of terrorism ever committed on United States’ soil.

Patriot Day is not to be confused with Patriot’s Day, which commemorates two of the earliest battles in the American Revolutionary War (Lexington and Concord in 1775). In observance of 9/11/2001, when nearly 3,000 people died (including 227 civilians and 19 hijackers aboard four planes and three emergency responders), we mark each September 11 as Patriot Day. Since Patriot Day is not a federal holiday, schools and businesses do not close and public transit systems run on their regular schedules. But many national observances are made:

  • Flags are prominently displayed outside American homes, inside the White House and on all United States government buildings in the world. Some flags are flown at half-mast as a mark of respect to those who died.
  • A moment of silence is often observed at 8:46 AM (Eastern Daylight Time). This marks the time that the first plane flew into the World Trade Center.
  • Some communities, particularly in the areas directly affected by the attacks, hold special church services or prayer meetings.
  • People who personally experienced the events in 2001 or lost loved ones, may lay flowers or visit memorials.

9/11 Memorial at World Trade Center Ground ZeroTo commemorate Patriot Day, we at the Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services would like to call attention to just 10 of the myriad lessons learned from the events of 9/11:

  1. Terrorism Hits Close to Home. Before 9/11, Americans tended to feel secure at home. September 11 made us realize that terror is next door instead of on the other side of the world.
  2. Heroes are everywhere. As a nation, we are at our best when times are at their worst.
  3. Don’t Judge a Book by its cover. Terrorism has many faces. So it is important to avoid judging people based on their race, religion, sex, or age.
  4. Air travel is integral to our way of life. When air travel completely ceased the week after 9/11, our entire country was at a standstill. We now realize how crucially important air travel is to our way of life and how important it is to safeguard the entire process.
  5. America remains vulnerable. Terrorism is a post 9/11-fact-of-life. As a nation, we were previously mostly aware of terrorist activities in foreign lands but did not expect them at home. Although security is tight and our defenses are up, we remain at risk.
  6. We can’t let the terrorists win. Although it might be tempting to hide and alter our lives greatly because of the fear generated by the 9/11 attacks, doing so would only help terrorists accomplish their goals. Our way of life is worth preserving and protecting.
  7. We each need to do our part. Never leave your bags unattended when you’re in a public location. Be aware of your surroundings. Speak up if you witness anything suspicious.
  8. Training is important. DHS has developed a variety of infrastructure protection training and educational tools for partners at the state and local level. Since 9/11, in total, more than 35,000 partners have taken risk mitigation training on a range of topics.
  9. Our resolve remains strong. As a result of 9/11, in many ways, we are stronger than we were before the attacks.

  10. Preparation is imperative. The best way to handle a disaster of any kind is to prepare long before it strikes. Our system is designed to provide online life safety training because it guarantees time efficiency, offers inexpensive rates, and helps bring your buildings up to code.

When a disaster of any kind strikes, prior planning and clear decisive action can help save lives. Our system offers a convenient and affordable solution to all of the training needs of your building(s). Choosing our service cuts property management training-related costs by 90% and saves you over 50% compared to conventional training! More importantly, it saves lives.

Lessons Learned in the 10 Years since 9/11

Wednesday, August 31st, 2011
Crumbling 9/11

We've learned lots of safety lessons from September 11, 2001

Part 3 in our continuing series

Since August is U.S. Army Anti-Terrorism Awareness Month, and with the 10-year anniversary of 9/11 just around the corner, we are devoting five weeks to discuss the 10 lessons the world has learned from that fateful day and recommend emergency precautions that you should take now to give you and your family, friends, employees and colleagues the best chance of surviving another terrorist attack. In our third installment this week, here are two more lessons we’ve learned:

  1. Security-related incidents will likely impact transportation and travel.

The 9/11 attacks affected public transit, commuter rail, commercial vehicles and ferries, and resulted in the need for significant road repairs. What’s more, the way people travel has shifted since the now infamous act of terrorism on our country. According to the U.S. Travel Association:

  • Business travel was hit particularly hard by 9/11. Between 2011 and 2010, total volume declined, as businessmen and women exercised the option of replacing short business trips with conference calls.
  • The good news is that American leisure travel, on the other hand, has been resilient. Despite long lines and other symptoms of policies implemented by the Transportation Security Administration (TSA), the leisure segment has seen a 17% increase in travel since 2001.
  • International leisure travel to the U.S. basically lost an entire decade following the attacks. While global long-haul travel increased by 40%. During the same period, overseas travel to the United States rose by less than 2%.

While the travel industry reels, emergency management professionals strategize about ways to ensure safety for anyone traveling to or within the United States. Carefully monitoring and protecting travelers has become a critical part of safeguarding our nation. If you’ve flown since 2001, you’ve undoubtedly experienced the effects of heightened security at our nation’s airports. Among the changes:

  • Restricted Items—box cutters and other sharp objects as well as large quantities of liquids and gels are no longer allowed on airplanes.
  • Heightened security on aircraft—cockpit doors are bulletproof to prevent unauthorized access. Pilots also have the option to carry a gun. And more air marshals have been placed on flights. Curtains that used to divide first class and coach cabins have been removed.
  • Improved security screening—many passengers are patted down, everyone has to remove jackets, shoes and belts before passing through security checkpoints. Even casual comments made in passing (relative to terrorism or hijacking) are taken seriously.
  • Tighter Identification checks—all passengers must carry valid IDs.

Since restrictions could be placed on domestic and international travel in the event of another attack, systems have been put in place to alert citizens if it becomes necessary to ask residents to evacuate and/or avoid certain roads or areas for safety.

  1. Law enforcement involvement is necessary at local, state and federal levels due to the criminal nature of any and all terrorist attacks. Most counter-terrorism strategies involve an increase in standard police and local authorities. But did you know that you can play a part to aid officials in their efforts to protect the public?
  • Keep your eyes open and report suspicious activities to local agencies. The best way to do this is to become familiar with your surroundings so you will notice anything out of the ordinary.
  • The Army’s iWATCH Program encourages people to identify and report suspicious behavior that may be associated with terrorist activities.
  • The Department of Homeland Security (DHS) encourages people to help authorities by suggesting: If you see something, say something. If you notice suspicious activity, report it to your local police department. If you are experiencing an emergency, call 911.
  • Since attacks can come in the 3-D world or cyber space, the United States Computer Emergency Readiness Team offers a US-Cert Incident Reporting System. Learn to identify potential threats to your cyber security along with your physical safety.

When a disaster strikes, prior planning and clear decisive action can help save lives.  For the latest emergency management training for facility/building managers, contact Allied Universal, Inc. Our new Version 2.0 e-based training system offers the best emergency training system with automated and integrated features. Visit rjwestmore.com for more information and remember to BE SAFE.