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Posts Tagged ‘National Safety Month’

Focus on Active Shooter Situations

Tuesday, June 13th, 2017

Allied Universal Fire Life Safety Services recognizes National Safety Month

Observed each June, National Safety Month is an educational effort organized by the National Safety Council (NSC), which focuses on reducing leading causes of injury and death at work, on the road and in our homes and communities. With the hashtag #KeepEachOtherSafe, the campaign concentrates on one aspect of safety each week. NSC efforts align with the Allied Universal Fire Life Safety Training goal to save lives through preparation. To increase awareness, we are offering the following blog post, to help promote week three of the campaign: “Prepare for Active Shooters.”

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) recommends the following course of action if you find yourself in an active-shooter situation: RUN. HIDE. FIGHT. In other words, if you have the ability, quickly run as far away from the situation as possible. Then hide. Fight back only as a last resort. View this video to learn more:

Unfortunately, over the past few years, active shooting incidents have become all too common. Consider these two, for example, which have unfolded already this month in diverse locations across the country:

  1. June 5, 2017, Beauty College in Fort Wayne, IndianaA lone gunman entered the Ravenscroft Beauty College shortly before 7 p.m. and began shooting. One woman was seriously injured while others on the scene escaped without harm. The shooter was later found deceased, from an apparent suicide. Preliminary police reports suggest this may have been the result of a domestic disturbance between the shooter and his victim.
  1. June 5, 2017, Workplace Shooting, Orlando, Florida. A 45-year-old “disgruntled” employee entered his former workplace in Orlando armed with a semiautomatic handgun and a hunting knife. He fatally shot five people, and then committed suicide by turning the gun on himself.

Active shooter situations are quick and unpredictable. In many cases, in fact, the entire event will unfold before first responders arrive on scene. While facing an active shooter might be unimaginable, being prepared could save your life.

Keep these tips in mind:

  • Pay attention to your environment and locate the nearest two exits in any place you visit.
  • Run to a safe place immediately.
  • Leave your belongings behind.
  • If you’re unable to run, hide.
  • If you’re somewhere with a door, lock it or barricade it shut.
  • Silence electronic devices.
  • Call 911 if it is safe to do so.
  • As a last resort, try to incapacitate the shooter. In close-range cases, fighting increases your chance of survival.

About the NSC

Founded in 1913 and chartered by Congress, the NSC is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to eliminate preventable deaths at work, in homes and communities, and on the road through leadership, research, education and advocacy. NSC advances this mission by partnering with businesses, government agencies, elected officials and the public in areas of greatest risk – distracted driving, teen driving, workplace safety, prescription drug overdoses and safe communities.

About the Allied Universal Fire Life Safety Training System

Safety is important for everyone all year round, not just during National Safety Month. A convenient and affordable way to make sure you are prepared for disasters and emergencies of virtually every kind is to subscribe to the Allied Universal Fire Life Training System, which has been designed to help improve and save lives. For more information about the best system out there, or to subscribe, click here.

Additional active shooter response resources:

Information from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security
Active Shooter Booklet
Active Shooter Poster
Active Shooter Information
Security Awareness Tips
Active Shooter Emergency Planning
Workplace Violence
Workplace Violence Prevention Planning

June is National Safety Month

Tuesday, June 7th, 2016

Safety First and AlwaysOn the heels of celebrating National Building Safety Month in May, we feel it equally essential to note that June marks a more general but no less important annual observance – National Safety Month. Organized by the National Safety Council (NSC) and observed by thousands of organizations across the country, the campaign is designed to raise awareness about what it takes to stay #SafeForLife. National Safety Month focuses on reducing leading causes of injury and death at work, on the roads, as well as in private homes and communities. Each week in June, the NSC will provide free downloadable resources highlighting a specific safety topic. Many of the items are available in English and Spanish.

Week 1 (Through June 12)

Stand Ready to Respond

Lifetime of Risk InfographWhen seconds count, preparation is key. This is true in both natural and man-made disasters. To prepare, keep a fully stocked emergency preparedness kit in your home and vehicle. Be sure to include supplies such as food, water, necessary medications, a battery-powered radio, a flashlight and a first aid kit. And, just as you participate in emergency drills at work, run regular drills with your family.

Resources available through the NSC

Week 2 (June 13 – 19)

Be Healthy

Each day, decisions we make directly impact our health. So do your best to make smart food choices and exercise regularly. When an injury occurs, strive to work with your doctor to safeguard your health by making informed decisions about what types of medications to take. Keep young children safe around medications by properly storing medicines and vitamins away and out of a child’s reach.

Resources available through the NSC

Week 3 (June 20-26)

Watch Out for Dangers

Although, in a recent Allied Universal Training System blog post, we covered the importance of situational awareness, the topic is important enough to bear repeating. Even in familiar surroundings, constantly survey your surroundings for potential danger. Keeping an eye out for hazards can help you identify and avoid them before an injury or attack might occur. Looking at the world through this safety lens can help protect you and loved ones.

National Safety Month Logo 2016Resources available through the NSC

Week 4 (June 27-30)

Share Roads Safely

Vehicles traveling or disabled along our nation’s roadways are constantly at risk. Since it’s impossible to control the choices everyone makes while on the road, practice defensive driving. Getting behind the wheel is a time for patience and focus, qualities that can help you avoid a collision even if someone else makes a bad decision.

Resources available through the NSCNational Safety Council

Be sure to think about ways to use situational awareness to #BeSafe all of the time, not just during the month of June. A convenient and affordable way to make sure you are prepared for disasters and emergencies of virtually every kind is to subscribe to the Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services, which has been designed to help improve and save lives. For more information about the best system out there, or to subscribe, click here.

National Safe Toys and Gifts Month

Wednesday, December 9th, 2015

Plastic building blocksDecember is National Safe Toys and Gifts Month, so designated by the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), to raise awareness about potentially hazardous toys. Since toy purchases are at an all-time high during the holidays, we thought it a good idea to highlight the campaign with this week’s blog post.

Part of the CPSC initiatives include third-party testing laboratories which check toys for lead and phthalate limits, so they can identify dangerous toys before they reach consumer shelves. The commission also produces safety alerts. For example, one highlights the choking hazards of plastic film coverings that are on many toys.

girl on scooterTypes of toys to avoid this holiday season:

  • Scooters and similar riding toys. Since the popular Razor Scooter’s launch in 2000, there has been a sharp increase in ER visits due to falls associated with the toys. Avoid giving these types of toys as gifts, since they lead to numerous serious accidents every year—especially when operated without a helmet. If you do buy a scooter, be sure to include a properly-fitted helmet, as well.
  • Toys with small parts. Pay attention to the warning labels on toy boxes, because they provide guidelines relative to choking hazards as well as age-appropriateness. Lego sets and other similar toys are fun, but they don’t work for toddlers, since the kits come with lots of small choking hazards. A good rule of thumb is to place or imagine the toy-part-in-question fitting inside a toilet paper roll. If it fits, then it’s too small.
  • Toys that could cause eye injuries. Toy guns that shoot pellets or Nerf darts are fun, but are a leading cause of injury, with studies showing a significant increase in the eye injuries resulting from toy parts over the past few years. For example, the “Airsoft” brand of guns led to a significant number of injuries and should only be used with eye protection.

Portrait.Keep little ones safe during the holidays:

The holiday season is a hectic time, which means adult attention spans can be stretched to the limit. Keeping track of babies and toddlers can be especially difficult during family gatherings and other festive events. Here are some tips for protecting your youngest family members at large functions:

  • Dispose of wrapping paper and plastic packaging. Toy packaging contains various types of plastic covers, twist ties, and other bits and pieces. All of these are potential chewing and choking hazard for babies and toddlers. Whenever possible, collect and recycle materials as presents are opened.
  • Keep an eye on the fireplace. Hanukkah nights or Christmas morning are both great times for a cozy fire. But flammable materials should be handled responsibly. Keep them far from flames. And, because kids are curious, be sure your fireplace screen is sturdy. This is also a great time to talk to children about the serious dangers posed by fire.Christmas Fireplace Hearth with Wreath and Stockings
  • Watch your plants. Mistletoe and holly are poisonous if ingested, so keep toxic plants out of the reach of young children.

    Many Christmas plants are beautiful, but toxic.

    Many Christmas plants are beautiful, but toxic.

  • Be careful with alcoholic beverages. If you and guests are enjoying a few cocktails during a holiday party, take steps to keep drinks out of the hands of anyone under the age of 21. Children imitate parents. So make sure they can’t reach unattended beverages. Ask guests to remove empty and even partially-empty cups.
  • Carefully string Christmas tree lights. Toddlers and babies love the glow of lights. So keep strands high on the tree to make sure they are out of reach of tiny fingers. Glass ornaments are another potential hazard which should be replaced, moved to a higher location or boxed until children are old enough to ensure their safety.

Remember that safety is a daily priority, so be sure to think safety all of the time. A convenient and affordable way to make sure you are prepared for disasters and emergencies of virtually every kind is to subscribe to the Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services, which has been designed to help improve and save lives. For more information about the best system out there, or to subscribe, click here.

National Safety Month

Tuesday, June 9th, 2015

 

Grunge rubber stamp with text Be Safe,vector illustration

National Safety Month

When it comes to safety, many Americans worry most about the stories they see on TV — incidents such as airplane crashes, shark attacks and severe weather. However, while these types of disasters often headline network news, everyday threats to safety are far more common. To call attention to safety concerns at home, work and on the road, the National Safety Council devotes the month of June to raise awareness about what it takes to stay safe. We consider it a privilege to mark the occasion with this week’s blog post, because our mission at the Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services is to save lives through training, with the motto “Be Safe!”

In observance of National Safety Month, we challenge you to take steps to reduce the leading causes of injury and death at work, on the road and in your homes and communities. You may be surprised to learn that, during the course of your lifetime, you are far more likely to be killed while doing common, everyday things than you are to be the victim of a natural disaster or crime. In fact, the National Safety Council reports:

  • Your chances of being killed unintentionally through poison or a fall is one in 31, whereas your risk of being assaulted by someone brandishing a weapon is just one in 358.
  • Your risk of dying following an overdose of a prescription painkiller is one in 234, whereas your likelihood of suffering from electrocution is just one in 12,200.
  • Your odds of fatality in a motor vehicle crash are one in 112, while your chance of being in a plane crash are just one in 8,015.
  • You have a one in 144 chance of dying from falling out of a tree and only a one in 6,780 chance of being killed in a thunderstorm.
  • Your chances of being killed while riding in a car is one in 470. But you only have a one in 164,968 chance of dying from a lightning strike.
  • While walking along the sidewalk or crossing the street, your risk of dying is one in 704, but your risk of fatality resulting from a bee, hornet or wasp sting is one in 55,764.

To reduce your risk of injury or death from everyday activities, follow these seven safety tips:

  1. Drive the speed limit.
  2. Wear a seatbelt.
  3. Designate a driver or call a taxi or driving service such as Uber.
  4. Pull over if you need to read or answer a text message or make a call.
  5. Wipe away spills and tuck away cords.
  6. #BeSafe at home by installing handrails and non-slip bathmats.
  7. Take only the type and quantity of prescription medicine you have been prescribed.

For more information about National Safety Month, check out the National Safety Council website. We hope that this blog post will motivate you to do whatever it takes to #BeSafe. A convenient and affordable way to make sure you are prepared for disasters and emergencies of virtually every kind is to subscribe to the Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services, which has been designed to help improve and save lives.

Visit rjwestmore.com to read about the many ways proper planning can make a difference in numerous aspects of your professional and personal life.

OddsOfDying

National Safety Month

Tuesday, June 10th, 2014

Businessman Falling on Wet FloorEach June, the National Safety Council celebrates National Safety Month as a time to bring attention to key safety issues. Thousands of organizations across the country are taking part in the campaign to reduce the risk of the safety issues, including ending prescription drug abuse; preventing slips, trips and falls; being aware of surroundings; ending distracted driving and practicing summer safety. Safety is a high priority for those of us at the Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services. In fact, our motto, Be Safe, highlights the priority we put on safety. So we are taking this week’s blog posts to celebrate safety:

Week 1: Prevent Prescription Drug Abuse

Prescription drug abuseis the use of a medication without a prescription, in a way other than as prescribed, or for the experience or feelings elicited. According to several national surveys, prescription medications, such as those used to treat pain, attention deficit disorders, and anxiety, are being abused at a rate second only to marijuana among illicit drug users. The consequences of this abuse have been steadily worsening, reflected in increased treatment admissions, emergency room visits, and overdose deaths.

According to results from a 2010 national survey on drug use and health:

  • 2.4 million Americans used prescription drugs non-medically for the first time within the past year, which averages to approximately 6,600 initiates per day.
  • More than one-half were females.
  • About a third were aged 12 to 17.
  • Although prescription drug abuse affects many Americans, certain populations, such as youth, older adults, and women, may be at particular risk.

If you or anyone you know has a problem with prescription drugs, contact the National Institute on Drug Abuse.

Week 2: Stop Slips, Trips and Falls

According to the U.S. Department of Labor, slips, trips and spills make up the majority of general industry accidents, which account for:

  • 15 percent of all accidental deaths per year, the second-leading cause behind motor vehicles
  • About 25 percent of all reported injury claims per fiscal year
  • More than 95 million lost work days per year – about 65 percent of all work days lost
  • Falls are one of the leading causes of unintentional injuries in the United States, accounting for approximately 8.9 million visits to the emergency department annually (NSC Injury Facts 2011).

National Safety Month firedogAdults 55 and older are more prone to becoming victims of falls, with the resulting injuries often diminish the victim’s ability to lead active, independent lives. The number of fall-related deaths among those 65 and older is four times the number of falling-related deaths among all other age groups.

Most slips and trips occur due to a loss of traction between the shoe and the walking surface, or an inadvertent contact with a fixed or moveable object, which may lead to a fall. There are a variety of situations that may cause slips, trips and falls.

Many people have a friend or relative who has fallen, or have fallen themselves. In fact, falls are the second-leading cause of unintentional death in homes and communities, resulting in more than 25,000 fatalities in 2009. The risk of falling, and fall-related problems, rises with age and is a serious issue in homes and communities. So take the time to remove slip, trip and fall hazards to keep your family and/or your tenants safe.

Week 3: Be Aware of Your Surroundings

  • Whether it’s driving to the grocery store or going on a daily walk, to be safe, it’s crucial that you make yourself aware of your surroundings. By using simple precautions, you can safely enjoy the time you spend outside of your home. Here are some specific instructions for your safety. (But please remember that, while these tips can be helpful, they do not guarantee your safety. Immediately contact the police if you detect any suspicious behavior.):
  • Take a friend (even a furry one). Walking a dog, especially one inclined to bark at strangers, is better than venturing out alone.
    Take your cell phone with you so you can call 911 if you see something suspicious.
  • Let a friend or family member know where you’re going and when you plan to return.
  • Avoid walking too closely to bushes or areas with any kind of tall overgrowth.
  • Stay attentive to your surroundings and if listening to music, keep the volume at a low level so you can hear what’s going on around you.
  • Only run or walk in familiar areas.
  • Use caution when out at night. If you are out after dark, always carry a flashlight with fresh batteries.
  • Always walk on the sidewalk facing traffic. Facing traffic makes it more difficult for someone to drive up behind you without being noticed.
  • Before heading to your destination, make sure you have enough gas to get you there and back. You don’t want to be stranded alone.
  • If you feel like you are being followed, drive to the nearest gas station or open business. Do not drive home until you are completely sure you are alone.
  • Roll up the windows and lock all car doors every time you leave your car.
  • When you approach your car, have the key ready.
  • Avoid parking in isolated areas especially at night. If possible, park your car under a lamppost.

If You Are Attacked:

  • Noise is your most immediate defense. Not only will sound attract attention to you and make your location known but it may also cause the would-be attacker to flee.
  • If possible, run in the direction of help. An assailant usually will not engage in a pursuit because it could increase the possibility of detection or apprehension.
  • If the assailant demands your purse, keys or money, give it to him or her. Don’t risk your life.
  • Never leave the site of the attack when prompted by an attacker. Don’t believe an assailant that says he or she won’t hurt you if you leave with him or her. Stay where you are, fight and scream.

Week 4: Put an End to Distracted Driving

We recently wrote detailed blog posts about distracted driving. For details, please check out the links.

Bonus week: Summer Safety

It’s only fitting that we cover summer safety before the official start of summer on June 21. But because the topic is rather broad, we will feature the content in next week’s blog posts. So check back. And, in the meantime, #BE #SAFE.

When a disaster of any kind strikes, prior planning and clear decisive action can help save lives. The Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services is a convenient and affordable solution to all of the training needs of your building(s). Choosing our service cuts property management training-related costs by 90% and saves you over 50% compared to conventional training! More importantly, IT SAVES LIVES.

June is National Safety Month—Fall for Safety

Tuesday, June 18th, 2013

Did you know that June is National Safety Month? The National Safety Council (NSC) is sponsoring the awareness campaign because injuries are a leading cause of disability for people of all ages. What’s more, accidents are the leading cause of death for Americans ages 1 to 44. And since many accidents are preventable, it is worthwhile to take a few minutes to review these suggestions for simple, safe behaviors which, when practiced, can help eliminate injuries – and even death.

Fall Facts:

  • Falls are the leading cause of death due to injury among the elderly.
  • 87% of all fractures in the elderly are due to falls.
  • Falls account for 25% of all hospital admissions, and 40% of all nursing home admissions 40% of those admitted do not return to independent living; 25% die within a year.
  • Many falls do not result in injuries, yet a large percentage of non-injured fallers (47%) cannot get up without assistance.
  • Getting help after an immobilizing fall improves the chance of survival by 80% and increases the likelihood of a return to independent living.
  • Up to 40% of people who have a stroke have a serious fall within the next year.

How to Avoid Slips & Falls

Did you know you could injure your back, shoulders, or neck anytime you lift or carry heavy objects or do repetitive actions such as typing or working on an assembly line? Also disconcerting, more than 1 in3 older adults fall each year…spraining or breaking bones, tearing cartilage and/or exacerbating pre-existing health conditions. But don’t think that only hard-labor positions put you at risk. In fact, all types of work (even desk jobs) can lead to injuries. But don’t quit your job to stay safe—because half of all falls happen at home.

So, whether you are at home, at work or on vacation, take these steps to stay safe:

Some people think that the best thing to do if you’ve fallen, or if you’re afraid of falling, is to halt activity. Why take the chance of falling again, right? Actually, research shows that people who are less active are more likely to fall because they lack the strength and balance and they need to resist falls. This is why healthcare professionals recommend starting a regular exercise routine of any kind – even if you start by taking only a few steps every day.

  • Strength and stamina
  • Giving your heart, lungs and the rest of your cardiovascular system even a modest workout can make a tremendous difference in the way you feel, in your energy level, and in the way you go about enjoying life as best you can.
  • Balance–when you were very young, you had to learn to balance yourself, and unless you continue to use your balance under safe conditions, this vital skill diminishes. Balance also helps you to keep the mass of your body over your feet, which helps you maintain your stability when moving your weight from one position to another.
  • Gait–regain some of the spring in your step, and practice walking (either alone, or with a cane or walker) with a stronger, safer and more fluid gait.
  • Reflexes–exercise can make you more responsive and help you react more safely to obstacles in your path and other potential dangers.

So the bottom line is that the best way to stay safe from falls is to stay healthy so you can quickly recover even if you do fall! The Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services is a convenient and affordable solution to all of the training needs of your building(s). Choosing our service cuts property management training related workloads by 90% and saves you over 50% compared to conventional training! More importantly, IT SAVES LIVES!