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Holiday Safety Tips 2016

Tuesday, December 20th, 2016

Christmas Fire HazardWith so much to do during the holidays, it can be easy to forget that safety should remain a primary concern at home, at work and on the job. The holidays are hardly the time to turn a blind eye to safety:

  • One of every three home Christmas tree fires is caused by electrical problems.
  • A heat source too close to trees causes one in every four of Christmas tree fires.
  • December is the peak month for home candle fires.
  • One out of three candle fires originate in the bedroom.
  • Typical symptoms of foodborne illness are vomiting, diarrhea, and flu-like symptoms, which can start anywhere from hours to days after contaminated food or drinks are consumed.
  • In the United States, motor vehicle crashes are in the top 10 causes of death for people aged 1-54, and more than 30,000 people are killed in crashes each year.

As a courtesy to our subscribers and friends, we have assembled some easy tips to help you and yours make this holiday season a safe and happy one.

DecorationsSafety Christmas and  New Year

  • Don’t use lit candles near trees, boughs, curtains/drapes, or with any other potentially flammable item.
  • When using artificial snow on windows or other surfaces, follow directions. These sprays can irritate lungs if they are inhaled.
  • Many holiday plants are poisonous if ingested. These include: mistletoe, holly berries, Jerusalem cherry and amaryllis. Keep these plants out of children’s reach.
  • When displaying a tree, cut off about two inches off the trunk and put the tree in a sturdy, water-holding stand. Keep the stand filled with water so the tree does not dry out quickly.
  • Position trees away from fireplaces, radiators and other heat sources. Make sure the tree does not impede foot traffic.
  • Avoid placing breakable ornaments where small children or pets can reach them.
  • If you opt for an artificial tree, choose one that is tested and labeled as fire resistant. Artificial trees with built-in electrical systems should have the “Underwriters Laboratory” (UL) label.
  • Use indoor lights indoors and outdoor lights only outdoors. Look for the UL label. Check lights for broken or cracked sockets, frayed or bare wires, and loose connections. Replace or repair any damaged light sets.
  • Use no more than three light sets on any one extension cord. Extension cords should be placed against the wall to avoid tripping hazards.
  • Inspect all lights, decorations and extension cords for damage before using.
  • Don’t ever run cords under rugs, around furniture legs or across doorways.
  • Turn off tree lights and decorations when you go to bed or leave the house. Unplug extension cords when not in use.
  • When displaying outdoor lights, fasten them firmly to a secure support with insulated staples or hooks to avoid wind damage.
  • Never nail, tack or stress wiring when hanging lights and keep plugs off the ground away from puddles and snow.
  • Don’t leave candles unattended. Whenever possible, opt for electronic versions, which provide a warm glow without the associated risk of fire.

danger Christmas lightsFood

  • Never eat dough or uncooked batter.
  • When preparing a holiday meal for friends and family, be sure to wash your hands, utensils, sink, and anything else that touches raw poultry.
  • Don’t defrost food at room temperature. Instead, thaw it in the refrigerator, in cold water or in the microwave.
  • Keep your knives sharp. Most knife injuries occur due to dull blades.
  • Use a clean food thermometer to cook foods to a safe internal temperature before serving.
  • Avoid cleaning kitchen surfaces with wet dishcloths or sponges, which harbor bacteria. Use paper towels, instead.
  • Keep cold foods cold and hot food hot. If you’re concerned that your coworker’s casserole has been sitting out too long, move along. Better to be food-safe than sorry.
  • Refrigerate or freeze leftovers in covered shallow containers within two hours of cooking.
  • When reheating leftovers, bring to at least 165°F to eliminate bacterial growth.

Vehicles

  • Check items such as the brakes, spark plugs, battery, and tires. Check your owner’s manual and follow recommendations for tune-up and oil change intervals.
  • Before heading out on winter roads, evaluate the condition of your tires. When in doubt, take your vehicle to a mechanic to make sure tread is sufficient.
  • Be prepared for emergency situations on the road by keeping a winter “survival kit” in your trunk. Include items such as a working flashlight, extra batteries, reflective triangles, compass, first aid kit, exterior windshield cleaner, ice scraper, snow brush, wooden stick matches in a waterproof container, and non-perishable, high energy foods like unsalted canned nuts, dried fruits and hard candy.
  • Keep anything of value in the trunk or covered storage area.Christmas.

Remember that safety is a priority for everyone all year long. A convenient and affordable way to make sure you are prepared for disasters and emergencies of virtually every kind is to subscribe to the RJWestmore Training System by Allied Universal Fire/Life Safety Services, which has been designed to help improve and save lives. For more information about the best system out there, or to subscribe, click here.

Visit www.AUS.com/tips for more ways to stay safe during the holidays

‘Tis the Season to Spread Holiday Safety and Security Tips

Tuesday, December 9th, 2014

tips-to-keep-your-holiday-safe-this-seasonHoliday Safety Part 2 of a 3-Part Series (Featuring Guest Blogger Angela Burrell of Universal Services of America. To see her original post, click here.)

‘Tis the Season to Spread Holiday Safety and Security Tips

According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, home holiday decorations cause more than 400 holiday fires each year, resulting in $15 million in property loss and damage. Nothing is as sad as a news story about a child dying in a Christmas tree fire or a father falling off of a ladder while decorating the exterior of his home. As our holiday gift to you, we would like to offer some tips to keep you and your loved ones safe this holiday season.

Last week, we examined safe practices for choosing, displaying and decorating Christmas trees as well as working with holiday paper. For part two of our series, we are happy to welcome guest blogger Angela Burrell, who is the public relations manager for our strategic partner, Universal Services of America. Her blog post covers holiday workplace safety home safety guidelines, and basic safety rules. Next week, we will conclude our three-week series by focusing on holiday travel, shopping and cooking.

safety tips holidayUniversal Services of America reminds you to keep the following safety and security tips in mind as you celebrate the holiday season. Regift them to family, friends, colleagues, co-workers and building occupants to let them know you care. Happy holidays!

Seven Workplace Alerts

  • Report all solicitors or suspicious persons to security immediately.
  • Be suspicious of unfamiliar people claiming to be repair persons, as thieves are apt to disguise themselves.
  • Make sure your receptionist clears any workers or contractors before allowing them into your office.
  • Question visitors who wander throughout your offices. Legitimate guests will appreciate your offers of assistance, while potential solicitors or thieves will be deterred.
  • Lock all personal items in a desk or file cabinet. Employees should never leave purses or wallets exposed where they can easily be stolen.
  • Close doors when the office is empty, and secure all valuables in a desk or closet when unattended.
  • Request a security or buddy escort to your car if you are working late and feel vulnerable.

happy holidaysSeven Basic Fire Rules

  • Fires peak, particularly in kitchens, during the holidays – so remain alert when preparing meals and keep potholders and food wrappers at least three feet away from heat sources.
  • Monitor candles and fireplace fires, and extinguish them before leaving the house or bedtime.
  • Test your smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors, ensuring that they work at optimal level year-round. Replace batteries, as needed.
  • Know where your exits are located and hold regular fire drills that include practicing at least two evacuation routes from every area or building.
  • Notify the property manager about exit lights that are broken or vandalized.
  • Never prop open self-closing doors, as they are designed to keep flames and smoke from spreading.
  • Keep exits and stairways free from obstructions at all times. Don’t store things on or under stairways, or on landings.

Six Home Safety Guides

  • Refresh your holiday lights; consider buying energy-efficient LED types that are cooler than conventional incandescent lights.
  • Limit the number of lights strung together and use appropriate ones for outdoors or indoors.
  • Turn off lights or decorations before bedtime, or set automatic timers for six or eight-hour increments to conserve energy.
  • Consider installing motion or lighting sensors that turn off automatically when no one is around.
  • Ask a neighbor to collect mail or have the post office hold it if you plan to travel for an extended period.
  • Let strangers who knock know you are home without opening your door. Do not feel compelled to donate to solicitors.

Five More Tips and Resources

Next week, check back, as we will finish our series about holiday safety. We hope that this blog post will help inform you about ways to #BESAFE this holiday season, and always, by taking necessary steps to improve your health and safety. The Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services is a convenient and affordable solution to helping improve and save lives. Visit our website for ways proper planning can make a difference in numerous aspects of your professional and personal life.

Holiday Decorating Safety

Tuesday, December 2nd, 2014

Holiday Safety 2014d

Part 1 of a 3-part series

According to the Consumer Product Safety Commission, home holiday decorations cause more than 400 holiday fires each year, resulting in $15 million in property loss and damage. Nothing is as sad as a news story about a child dying in a Christmas tree fire or a father falling off of a ladder while decorating the exterior of his home. As our holiday gift to you, we would like to offer some tips to keep you and your loved ones safe this holiday season. This week, we will look at safe practices for choosing, displaying and decorating Christmas trees as well as working with holiday paper. Next week, we will feature a guest blogger, whose entry will cover holiday workplace safety, basic safety rules and home safety guidelines. Finally, we will conclude our three-week series by focusing on holiday travel, shopping and cooking.

Holiday Safety for 2014

Holiday Safety 2014bChristmas Trees

Choosing your tree

  • Many artificial trees are fire resistant. If you choose to go with a fake tree, choose one that is rated as such.
  • If you decide to go with a live tree, freshness is key. A newly cut tree will stay green longer and be less of a fire hazard than a dry tree…not to mention it will look nicer than one that is dead and brown.
  • To check for freshness, remember that a fresh tree is green, and fresh needles are hard to pull from branches. They also do not give when bent between your fingers.
  • When the trunk of a tree is bounced on the ground, a shower of falling needles shows that tree is too dry. Keep looking.
  • The trunk of a freshly harvested tree should be sticky with resin.

Displaying your tree

  • Before deciding where to put your tree, think about more than whether it is located near a picture window. Instead, make sure you choose a place in your home that is clear of all sources of heat including fireplaces, radiators and lamps.
  • Heated rooms dry out trees rapidly, creating fire hazards. So make sure your home remains relatively cool.
  • When prepping the tree, cut off about two inches of the trunk to expose fresh wood for sufficient water absorption. Trim away branches as necessary to set your tree trunk in the base of a sturdy, water-holding stand with wide spread feet. Keep the stand filled with water while the tree is indoors.
  • Place the tree out of the way of traffic and do not block doorways. If necessary, use thin guide-wires to secure a large tree to walls or ceiling. These wires are nearly invisible but will keep the tree safe even in the event of an earthquake or other natural disaster.

Holiday Safety 2014Decorating

  • Artificial snow sprays can irritate lungs if inhaled. If you like the look of a flocked tree, just make sure you avoid potential injury by reading container labels and carefully following directions.
  • Interior Lighting. Use only lights that have been tested for safety. Identify these by the label from an independent testing laboratory.
  • Check each set of lights, new or old, for broken or cracked sockets, frayed or bare wires, or loose connections. Discard damaged sets or repair them before using.
  • Fasten outdoor lights securely to trees, house, walls or other firm support to protect from wind damage.
  • Use no more than three standard-size sets of lights per single extension cord.
  • Turn off all lights on trees and other decorations when you go to bed or leave the house. If they are not properly displayed, lights could short and start a fire.
  • Use colored spotlights above or beside a tree instead of fastened onto it.
  • Keep “bubbling” lights away from children. The bright colors and bubbling movement could tempt curious children to break the light, leaking poisonous liquid and posing an electrical hazard.

Wrapping-related Safety

  • If you decide to make paper decorations, choose papers, glitter and adhesives that are not flammable.
  • Don’t place trimming near open flames or electrical connections.
  • Remove all wrapping papers from tree and fireplace areas immediately after presents are opened.
  • Do not ever burn papers in the fireplace. A flash fire may result as wrappings ignite suddenly and burn intensely.

Next week, check back, as we will continue our series about holiday safety. We hope that this blog post will help inform you about ways to #BESAFE this holiday season, and always, by taking necessary steps to improve your health and safety. The Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services is a convenient and affordable solution to helping improve and save lives. Visit our website for ways proper planning can make a difference in numerous aspects of your professional and personal life.

How to Prevent Tree and Candle Fires This Holiday Season

Tuesday, December 17th, 2013

Over the weekend, an Oklahoma family suffered a house fire which originated in their living room and was reportedly caused by a live Christmas tree. Thankfully, no one was hurt and the bulk of the damage was caused by smoke. However, not everyone is so lucky. The NFPA reports that, across the country, fire departments respond to an average of 230 home fires which start with Christmas trees. Over the past several weeks, we’ve blogged about a myriad of holiday safety issues. This week, we would like to turn our attention to two of the most flammable holiday decorations—Christmas trees and candles.

 

NFPA Facts about Home Holiday Fires

  • Christmas trees account for hundreds of fires annually.
  • One of every three home Christmas tree fires is caused by electrical problems.
  • Although Christmas tree fires are not common, when they do occur, they are more likely to be serious.
  • On average, one of every 40 reported home structure Christmas tree fires results in a death compared to an average of one death per 142 total reported home structure fires.
  • A heat source too close to the tree causes roughly one in every six of Christmas tree fires.
  • More than half (56%) of home candle fires occur when something that can catch on fire is too close to the candle.
  • December is the peak time of year for home candle fires. In December, 11% of home candle fires began with decorations compared to 4% the rest of the year.
  • Typically, shorts in electrical lights or open flames from candles, lighters or matches start tree fires.
  • Well-watered trees are not a problem. A dry and neglected tree can be.

Tree Fire Safety

  • Purchase only fresh trees. If needles are brittle or shed easily, choose a different tree.
  • When setting up the tree at home, place it at least three feet away from any heat source. In addition to the fireplace, stay away from radiators, heating vents and lighting. These can dry out a tree and increase its flammability.
  • Keep the tree stand filled with water at all times.
  • Don’t leave the tree up for an extended period. Fire safety professionals recommend you do not leave it up for longer than two weeks.
  • When you dismantle the tree, discard it immediately. Do not leave it in a garage, on a porch or at the side of the house. A dried-out tree is highly flammable and can cause major damage even when it is just sitting outside. Check with your local community for a recycling program.

Candle Fire Safety

  • Candles cause home fires — and home fire deaths.
  • A candle is an open flame, which means that it can easily ignite anything that can burn.
  • Extinguish candles when you leave the room or go to bed.
  • Avoid the use of candles in the bedroom and other areas where people may fall asleep.
  • Keep candles at least 12 inches away from anything that can burn.
  • Consider using flameless candles in your home.
  • If you decide to burn candles, make sure that you:
    • Use candle holders that are sturdy, and won’t tip over easily.
    • Put candle holders on a sturdy, uncluttered surface.
    • Light candles carefully.
    • Keep your hair and any loose clothing away from the flame.
    • Don’t burn a candle all the way down — put it out before it gets too close to the holder or container.
    • Don’t use a candle if oxygen is used in the home.
    • Have flashlights and battery-powered lighting ready to use during a power outage.

Religious Candle Safety

  • Whether you are using one candle, or more than one on a candelabra, kinara, or menorah, make sure you take a few moments to learn about using candles safely.
  • Candles should be placed in a sturdy candle holder.
  • Handheld candles should never be passed from one person to another.
  • When lighting candles at a candle lighting service, have the person with the unlit candle dip their candle into the flame of the lit candle.
  • Lit candles should not be placed in windows where a blind or curtain could catch fire.
  • Candles placed on, or near tables, altars, or shrines, must be watched by an adult.
  • Blow out candles when you leave the room or go to sleep.
  • If a candle must burn continuously, be sure it is enclosed in a glass container and placed in a sink, on a metal tray, or in a deep basin filled with water.

When a disaster strikes, prior planning and clear decisive action can help save lives. The Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services is a convenient and affordable solution to all of the training needs of your building(s). Choosing our service cuts property management training-related costs by 90% and saves you over 50% compared to conventional training! More importantly, IT SAVES LIVES.

How to BE SAFE this Holiday Season

Tuesday, December 3rd, 2013

Holiday Safety Tips

Whether you celebrate Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanzaa or an occasion you made up yourself, we want to make sure you stay safe this holiday season. So, from all of us at the Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services, please read and follow our Holiday Safety Tips and accept our warmest wishes for a safe and wonderful celebration:

Decorations

  • Don’t use lighted candles near trees, boughs, curtains/drapes, or with anything that is potentially flammable.
  • Wear gloves while decorating with “angel hair.” It can irritate your eyes and skin.
  • When spraying artificial snow, be sure to follow manufacturer’s instructions carefully. Sprays like these can irritate your lungs.
  • Small children may think that holiday plants look good enough to eat. Unfortunately, many holiday plant varieties (such as mistletoe, holly berries, Jerusalem cherry and amaryllis) are poisonous and/or can cause severe stomach problems if ingested. So keep them well out of the reach of kids.
  • Cut off about two inches off the trunk of your tree and place the base in a sturdy, water-filled stand. Monitor water level so the tree does not dry out and become combustible.
  • Cut a few inches off the trunk of your tree to expose fresh wood. This allows for better water absorption and will keep your tree from drying out and becoming a fire hazard.
  • Stand your tree away from fireplaces, radiators and heat sources. Also, for safety, don’t place the tree where it blocks foot traffic or doorways.
  • Avoid placing breakable tree ornaments on low-hanging branches where small children or pets can reach them.
  • If you opt for an artificial tree, choose one that has been tested and labeled as fire resistant. Artificial trees with built-in electrical systems should be approved by the Underwriters Laboratory (UL).
  • Use indoor lights inside and outdoor lights outside. Check lights for broken or cracked sockets, frayed or bare wires, and loose connections. Replace or repair damaged light sets.
  • Use no more than three light sets on any one extension cord. Extension cords should be placed against the wall to prevent tripping hazards. Never run cords under rugs, around furniture legs or across doorways.
  • Turn off lights on trees and decorations when you go to bed or leave the house.
  • Unplug extension cords when they are not in use.
  • If using a natural tree, keep it well watered so dry branches won’t ignite when they touch warm bulbs.
  • If you decide to display outdoor lights, fasten them firmly to a secure support with insulated staples or hooks.
  • Don’t nail or tack wiring when hanging lights.
  • Keep plugs off the ground, far from puddles and snow.

Food

  • When preparing a holiday meal for friends and family wash your hands, utensils, the sink and countertop, and anything else that comes in contact with raw poultry.
  • Don’t defrost food at room temperature. Thaw it in the refrigerator, in cold water or in the microwave.
  • Keep knives sharp. Believe it or not, most knife injuries occur due to dull blades instead of sharp ones.
  • Use a clean food thermometer to make sure internal temperature of food is safe.
  • Avoid cleaning kitchen surfaces with wet dishcloths or sponges. These harbor bacteria and promote bacteria growth. For safety, use clean paper towels instead.
  • When reheating leftovers, bring the temperature up to at least 165°F to eliminate the risk of bacterial growth.
  • Refrigerate or freeze leftovers in covered shallow containers within two hours after cooking.

Toys

  • Make sure toys suit the age, abilities, skills and interest level of the intended child.
  • Read instructions carefully before allowing your child to play with something he or she has received as a gift.
  • To prevent burns and electrical shock, don’t give young children toys that must be plugged into an electrical outlet. On average, battery-operated toys are safer.
  • Since young kids can choke on small parts, follow government recommendations that say toys for children under the age of three cannot contain parts that are less than 1 1/4 inches in diameter and 2 1/4 inches long.
  • Keep children from swallowing button batteries and magnets. These are found in musical greeting cards, remote controls, hearing aids and other small electronics as well as toys. If your child swallows a battery of any kind, immediately call your health care provider.
  • Remove strings and ribbons from toys before giving them to young children.
  • Children can choke or suffocate on broken balloons. So do not allow children under age eight to play with them.
  • Pull-toys with strings that are more than 12 inches in length are choking hazards for babies. Keep kids away from strings and cords.
  • Store toys in designated locations, such as on a shelf or in a toy chest.

For more about holiday safety, check out the free information provided by the National Safety Council, the National Fire Protection Association and our previous posts. When a disaster strikes, prior planning and clear decisive action can help save lives. The Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services is a convenient and affordable solution to all of the training needs of your building(s). Choosing our service cuts property management training-related costs by 90% and saves you over 50% compared to conventional training! More importantly, IT SAVES LIVES.

Holiday Decoration Safety Tips

Tuesday, December 11th, 2012

Part 1 of a 2-Part Series

While it may not be as much to think about holiday safety as it is to go Christmas shopping, it’s imperative that you take time to consider how to make the season as safe as possible. According to FEMA, the holidays pose serious fire hazards:

  1. In December, 72% of structure fires occur in residential buildings.
  2. The use of traditional adornments such as Christmas trees and decorations provide additional points of igni­tion that increase the incidence of holiday fires.
  3. The leading cause of December residential building-structure fires involve cooking.

To help make holiday fire-prevention easy, the professionals at Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services have assembled a few tips to help you and your friends, family and colleagues BE SAFE this holiday season. This week, we will focus on trees and lighting. Check out next week’s post, as well, as we’ll tackle kitchen safety tips relative to holiday cooking and wrapping.

Lights

Outdoors

  • Make sure the light strands you select to use outside are approved for outdoor use.
  • Only use lights that have been tested and approved for safety. This identification will be labeled by an independent testing laboratory.
  • Keep lights far from flammable sources such as dry timber and paper products.
  • Fasten lights securely to trees, your house or exterior walls or to anchor strands and prevent wind damage.

Indoors

  • As with outdoor lights, use only interior decorating lights that have been tested and approved for safety. Identifications of this kind are made by independent testing laboratories.
  • Check light sets whether new or old, for broken or cracked sockets, frayed or bare wires and loose connections.
  • Discard or repair damaged sets. It is better to postpone decorating than deal with the aftermath of a structural fire. So take the time to make sure your lights are fire safe.
  • Use no more than three standard-size sets of lights per single extension cord.
  • Turn off lights (as well as other decorations) when you go to bed or leave the house. This will prevent lights from shorting out and starting fires.
  • Don’t use electric lights on a metallic tree.
  • Trees can become charged with electricity from faulty lights. If this happens, anyone who touches a branch of the affected tree runs the risk of electrocution! To avoid this, use colored spotlights above or beside trees instead of fastening large lights directly to a tree.
  • Keep “bubbling” lights away from children. Any lights that feature bright colors and bubbling could tempt curious children to break candle-shaped glass. This is dangerous as the glass can cut and the liquid contents contain hazardous chemicals.

Candles

  • This should go without saying. But we would rather you BE SAFE than sorry. So we want to make sure to warn against anyone using lighted candles on a tree or near evergreens of any kind.
  • Use only non-flammable candle holders.
  • Place candles far out of reach of children as well as out of pathways where they could potentially be knocked down or blown over.
  • If you are lighting a menorah, make sure the candlelight is far from decorations and wrapping paper. Cellophane packaging and gift bags with tissue paper are great for wrapping. But they are also extremely flammable. So store them far from candles.

Trees

  • Fresh trees are green. If someone tries to sell you a tree that is brown, back slowly away and find another lot.
  • Fresh needles are difficult to pull off of branches. If needles fall like snow, find another tree.
  • Fresh needles are difficult to break. Don’t buy a tree that has brittle needles.
  • Many artificial trees are fire resistant. If you buy one, look for a statement specifying this protection.
  • The butt of a fresh tree is sticky with resin.
  • When the trunk of a tree is bounced on the ground, a shower of falling needles shows that tree is too dry.
  • Place tree away from fireplaces, radiators and other heat sources. Heated rooms dry trees rapidly, which could create a fire hazard.
  • When preparing your tree to place in a stand, cut off two inches of the trunk to expose fresh wood for effective water absorption.
  • Trim extra branches and set the trunk in the base of a sturdy, water-holding stand. Keep the stand filled with water as long as the tree is indoors.
  • Place your tree out of the pathway of traffic and don’t block doorways.

Next week, we’ll cover more holiday safety tips. Until then, enjoy holiday preparations and BE SAFE. When a disaster strikes, prior planning and clear decisive action can help save lives. For the latest emergency management training for facility/building managers, check out the Allied Universal Training System by Universal/Fire Life Safety Services. Our new Version 3.0 system offers the best emergency training system on the market.

Holiday Safety Tips from A-Z

Monday, November 22nd, 2010
A tangle of green and blue Christmas lights

Make sure your family, friends and staff remain safe during the holidays.

‘Tis the Season – For Safety

You know the story. Every year, beginning in mid-November, the local news starts discussing the dangers posed by Christmas trees and other holiday hazards. Let us take the opportunity to go beyond their typical tip of the day to give you an A to Z guide in order to ensure you and your family, friends and business associates are safe during the holidays.

Always remember to turn off the Christmas tree lights!

Be careful when walking to your car…especially if you are carrying holiday gifts.

Call ahead to find out how crowded streets near shopping centers are, to avoid encountering crazy drivers in holiday traffic

Drag your tree to the curb, or, better yet…check into tree recycling programs so you won’t create a dried-out fire hazard.

Extinguishers are vital to deal with fires! Make sure yours aren’t past their prime and that you are properly trained to use one.

Fire and emergency exit codes are important considerations when you host parties. So don’t invite 70 people to your studio apartment.

Get involved with Fire Prevention Week every year.

Happy Holidays from Allied Universal!

Immune Systems are taxed by too many activities. Get some rest so you will stay healthy.

Juices from uncooked foods can be contaminated. Keep a clean kitchen for happy and healthy guests.

Kitchen fires are prevalent during the holidays… the source of 40% of all house fires.

Lights on the tree should be checked for cracked wires. Also, connect no more than three strands together.

Manage holiday stress to stay healthy.

New toys should be carefully checked for safety and age-appropriateness.

Overloading electrical circuits can spark fires. Do your Christmas lights have to be visible from space?

Power lines should be avoided when hanging outdoor lights. Also, for outdoor light safety, use a fiberglass or wooded ladder.

Quit smoking for your own health and to reduce the risk of fire.

Remove lights or electrical decorations when they flicker or show other signs of wear.

Smokers should stay outside in designated areas. (See Q for another smoking-safety tip.)

Test smoke alarms.

Unplug Christmas lights when you are changing broken bulbs.

Viruses like the common cold love holiday’s parties! Consider distributing hand sanitizer as a party favor.

Windows are not the place to hang holiday decorations. Drapes and lit candles or hot light bulbs don’t mix.

Xeriscaping your yard this winter can help lower your risk for fire next summer.

Your business needs an evacuation plan, especially if you will be hosting a massive holiday party.

Zero water means a dry tree. Don’t be stingy with the H2O.

Remember, you can have fun and be safe at the same time! Follow holidays safety tips to ensure your family and coworkers have a fun and safe holiday’s season!

When a disaster strikes, prior planning and clear decisive action can help save lives.  For the latest emergency management training for facility/building managers, contact Allied Universal, Inc. Our new Version 2.0 e-based training system offers the best emergency training system with automated and integrated features. Visit rjwestmore.com for more information and remember to BE SAFE.

Halloween Safety Tips

Tuesday, October 27th, 2009
BE SAFE

BE SAFE

Trick-or-treating is a traditional childhood holiday favorite. But while fun may be a child’s main priority, safety is the top concern for parents. Horror stories about ghosts and goblins, and even scarier real-life tales of kidnappers and poisonend treats, are legitimate causes for fear on October 31.

Several organizations provide Halloween safety tips, including Allied Universal, Inc. We have compiled the following simple instructions to give kids a, safe, fun, exciting holiday experience, while providing parents with peace of mind.

Allied Universal Top 20 Tips for a safe and sane Halloween:

  1. If possible, send a responsible teenager or adult to escort your kids.
  2. Prepare the route in advance.
  3. Tell people where you plan to go.
  4. Make sure costumes are short enough to prevent tripping, entanglement or potential contact with flames.
  5. Dress in light-colored or reflective-type clothing so you are visible. (Also, remember to put reflective tape on bikes, skateboards and brooms, too!)
  6. Use non-toxic and hypoallergenic makeup and small decorative hats as safe alternatives to toxic materials and large caps that could block vision.
  7. Before they head out, casually remind your children to “Stop-Drop-Roll” in the unlikely event that their clothes catch fire. Try not to alarm them. You want them to be prepared instead of scared.
  8. To prevent possible fire, use only battery-powered lanterns or chemical lightsticks in place of candles in decorations and costumes.
  9. Look both ways before crossing the street, checking carefully for cars, trucks and low-flying brooms.
  10. Cross the street only at corners.
  11. Never hide or dart between parked cars.
  12. Walk, slither and sneak on sidewalks instead of the street.
  13. Carry a flashlight and extra batteries, to light the way.
  14. Only visit homes that have illuminated porch lights.
  15. Keep costumes away from open fires and candles. (Bear in mind that many are flammable.)
  16. Accept treats at the door instead of entering strangers’ homes.
  17. Be cautious of strangers and animals.
  18. Inspect treats before enjoying.
  19. Don’t eat candy if the package is already open. Small, hard pieces of candy are a choking hazard for young children.
  20. To keep neighborhood children safe, eliminate potential tripping hazards on your porch and walkway.

Another good resource, called the “Lucky 13,” was prepared by the American Red Cross. Also helpful are tips assembled by the Los Angeles Fire Department.

Sharing simple safety rules with your child is just another great way Allied Universal encourages folks to BE SAFE!