Contact Us For A Demo

Archive for the ‘Fraud’ Category

Robotics and Cyber Security

Tuesday, November 29th, 2016

Robot man in thinking pose.Many thanks our guest blogger, Mark McCourt, of Allied Universal 

Mark McCourt of Allied Universal

Mark McCourt of Allied Universal

The emergence of smart technology into the security sector is changing risk management economics and strategy in unique ways. Such technology leverages information management at its core for a more effective security program. Case in point is the burgeoning role of autonomous data machines (ADMs or robots) that are purposely built for security.

Will the advent of robots eliminate physical security officers at a site? Not any time soon, but robots are a real force multiplier by adding effectiveness and efficiency to security programs. The use of ADM technology augments security personnel by providing “smart eyes and ears” that enable security officers to manage information and communicate quickly and effectively.

Threats, crime and mischief do not operate on a timetable, nor do they sleep. Robots provide 24/7 autonomous patrolling and monitoring including autonomous recharging without human intervention, so that a company’s assets can be secure 24/7.

Hence, the new partnership formed this year between Allied Universal and Knightscope has brought this sophisticated technology to California clients and it is expected to be offered nationally in 2017.

Robot and shieldThe reasons to include robots in your security program include:

  • Cost savings—cost reduction without sacrificing security coverage.
  • Constant coverage—24/7 physical security presence with autonomous patrolling and monitoring.
  • Force multiplier—More effective information sourcing and sharing, accessible in real time from the desk or on the run.
  • Monitoring, detection and alert capabilities—Human error is reduced with improved incident and response resolution time with analytics, information sharing and reporting capabilities.
  • Works with new platforms—A mobile app allows security officers to engage with the robots and use them as tools to cover more ground and do their jobs more effectively.Colorful applications on smartphone.

Leveraging robotic technology with manpower is the latest trend in asset protection. Blending the technology with people may prove to pay off for clients in the long run. It’s also a methodology more industries may soon tout as the new normal.

Remember that safety is a daily priority for everyone – in the 3D world as well as cyberspace. A convenient and affordable way to make sure you are prepared for disasters and emergencies of virtually every kind is to subscribe to the Allied Universal Training System by Allied Universal Fire/Life Safety Services, which has been designed to help improve and save lives. For more information about the best system out there, or to subscribe, click here.

Black Friday and Cyber Monday Shopping Tips

Monday, November 21st, 2016

Santa Claus shopping running pushing cart reindeer black friday sale

Guest Blogger, Angela Burrell, of Allied Universal

Guest Blogger, Angela Burrell, of Allied Universal

 

Thanksgiving is not only a time for expressing gratitude and enjoying family and friends, the holiday marks two of the busiest shopping opportunities in the U.S.—Black Friday and Cyber Monday. Follow these extra tips for a safe holiday and secure shopping experience.

 

 

Black Friday (Day after Thanksgiving)

Staying AlertCCTV Security camera shopping department store on background.

  • Deals are now beginning well before Friday, with stores staying open later, so businesses and shoppers should plan for crowds.
  • Park close to your destination, in a well-lit area, and lock packages in the trunk, out of sight.
  • Avoid parking next to vans or large trucks that can block your vehicle from the sight of others.
  • Be aware of your surroundings. If you witness any suspicious behavior, leave the area immediately.

Guarding Against Theft

  • Use ATMs in well-populated areas during the day, and do not leave receipts at the ATM location.
  • Never leave your purse or smartphone unattended in a shopping cart, on a countertop or in your car.
  • Take extra care with purses and wallets; carry your purse close to your body and your wallet in an inside or zippered pocket.

Protecting Yourself

  • Shop with others, when possible. If shopping with small children, establish a meeting point in case of separation inside a store or mall.
  • Teach small children how to seek help from store personnel or store security in case you are separated.
  • Report any suspicious activity to store/mall security or law enforcement. If you see something, say something.
  • Request a security escort to help with oversized purchases and to accompany you to your car if you feel vulnerable while shopping alone at night.
  • When returning to your vehicle, keep your keys out and lock your doors as soon as you are inside.

Cyber Monday (Monday after Thanksgiving)

online shoppingOnline Shopping

  • Shop with known businesses; do your research about their past performances and financial stability.
  • Conduct transactions on a secure server only; look for the padlock device on the browser’s status bar. The URL should change from http to shttp or https when asked for payment information indicating that the purchase is encrypted or secure.
  • Do not record your social security or driver’s license number online, as it is not needed for purchases.
  • Have packages delivered to an address where they will not be left unattended.

Protecting Data

  • Secure web servers that contain customer information.
  • Add the latest anti-virus and anti-spyware software to your computers, and update firewalls regularly.
  • Check your receipt to ensure that the actual price paid is the same amount charged to your card.
  • Monitor your credit card statements for any unauthorized charges.

www.AUS.com

Remember that safety is a daily priority for everyone – whether you are shopping at home or in a mall and even when you aren’t shopping at all. A convenient and affordable way to make sure you are prepared for disasters and emergencies of virtually every kind is to subscribe to the Allied Universal Training System by Allied Universal Fire/Life Safety Services, which has been designed to help improve and save lives. For more information about the best system out there, or to subscribe, click here.

Knock-Knock Crimes on the Rise

Tuesday, August 16th, 2016

Hand knocking on the doorA home invasion robbery is a terrifying experience. The crime represents an alarming invasion of privacy which disrupts the place people should feel safe. Unfortunately, the trend doesn’t seem to be slowing down, as dozens of people have been targeted by a home invasion referred to as “knock-knock” crimes. This increasingly common event is troublesome, because criminals find it relatively simple to execute. A thief can work alone, knocking on doors in any given neighborhood until he or she discovers an empty house, or in a group – one person knocking and then standing guard, while others break in. Another tactic is for criminals to take advantage of homeowners by falsely claiming that they kicked a ball into the resident’s yard or that they need to use the phone because their car broke down and their cellphone battery died – all as a means of entering the home.

What can homeowners and/or tenants do to prevent such intrusions?

Here are some possible deterrents to knock-knock crimes:

  • Don’t open the door unless you know who is knocking. A simple, “No thanks, not interested” may be all it takes to convince the suspect to move along. Most criminals look for targets of opportunity. So make sure you remain alert. If a stranger at your door claims to work a utility company, ask to see his or her I.D. badge and pay attention to whether or not the visitor is wearing a uniform. Also, check to make sure he or she arrived in a labeled utility truck. Remember – it’s your home; you’re in charge. Better safe than sorry.

    Check the ID of anyone who claims to work for a utility company.

    Check the ID of anyone who shows up at your door, claiming to work for a utility company.

  • Companies such as Ring offer “smart doorbells,” which feature video cameras as well as smartphone alerts. These tools allow the user to talk via their cellphone directly into the doorbell speaker. These doorbells aren’t foolproof, and users need to be actively using their phones to deter thieves. However, the apps provide video footage of suspects, which could be useful to law enforcement.
  • Do not hesitate to call police. If you feel threatened or see a burglary in progress at a neighbor’s home, dial 9-1-1.
  • Keep your phone handy when you are at home. A teenage girl who was home alone at the time of a recent home invasion talked to authorities while robbers were tearing apart her home.
  • Lock windows and doors when you are away from home. Use motion sensor lights, and “Beware of Dog” signs. The more deterrents you can place in the path of thieves, the better.
  • Use a safe. Criminals using the knock-knock method are looking for a quick score. A secured and heavy safe is an easy and affordable way to deter theft of valuable possessions. Choose a safe that is sufficient to contain your valuables and heavy enough to eliminate the potential of robbers making off with the locked safe.

Thieves don’t just use distraction as an element of surprise in knock-knock crimes. Consider these other scams:Businessman and gas station

  • Robbed while pumping gas. This crime occurs when a person driving solo has to exit the vehicle to purchase and pump gas. Most people make the mistake of leaving car doors unlocked. So, when their attention is fixed on swiping and entering credit card information, a thief squats down so he or she can quietly open the passenger side door to grab a purse or phone. To avoid this type of crime, lock your doors as you exit your car. And stay next to or inside the car while pumping gas. Criminals engaged in this type of theft are known as “sliders,” a reference to the thieves sliding alongside cars under the guise of buying gas.
  • Watch for pickpockets. When traveling through crowded areas, such as in airports or subways, keep a hand on your valuables. A common pickpocketing scam is for thieves to yell, “Someone stole my wallet” and then watch as potential victims instinctively grab their wallets or purses – disclosing the location of their valuables.

The Allied Universal Training System now offers residential training modules. Our system is designed to help keep building occupants safe…whether they are at home or at work. Remember that safety is a daily priority. Staying aware of common scams and threats is essential for protecting your property, life, and family. A convenient and affordable way to make sure you are prepared for disasters and emergencies of virtually every kind is to subscribe to the Allied Universal Training System by Allied Universal, which has been designed to help improve and save lives. For more information about the best system out there, or to subscribe, click here.

How to Avoid Disaster-Related Fraud

Monday, July 25th, 2016

Deception Concept - Disguise Between Shark And GoldfishWhen disasters such as earthquakes or floods strike the United States, an outpouring of financial and emotional support pours in for the victims. Unfortunately, some people prey upon this type of generosity by defrauding disaster victims, donors, and the government. Disaster-related fraud takes several forms, from bogus websites luring people to make donations to fake construction contractors who extract money from vulnerable homeowners.

Another example occurs when merchants hike the prices of supplies that are in high demand by disaster victims. For example, during the recent West Virginia flooding, some merchants, such as local hotels and restaurants, were raising rates for bottled water and toiletries in order to cruelly capitalize on short-term demand.

Avoid Fraudulent Donation Workers and Sites

Some unscrupulous individuals pose as workers for charitable organizations, saying that they  are “collecting donations” after a disaster. They will push people to give cash donations which are untraceable and cannot be rescinded. To protect yourself, always ask for identification from volunteers seeking donations, and to be 100% sure of their affiliation,  donate directly through the charity’s main website.

After Hurricane Katrina, several people were convicted of impersonating Red Cross workers and dozens of fraudulent donation websites were shut down by authorities.

Make note of these red flags to help you spot fake donation sites:

  • 100% to victims promise! Genuine charities have overhead, so they can’t possibly give 100% of the donations they collect directly to victims.
  • Site and email misspellings and grammar errors. Compare each website with the official website for the charity. And before inquiring on the satellite site, do a search for the email address on the main charity’s website. After Katrina, unscrupulous scammers purchased the domain name @redcross.org and set up an email account called support2@redcross.org, a spoofed Red Cross email address which took people to a fraudulent website for “donations.”Swiss cross red flag
  • Check the site’s “contact us” information. Legitimate charities will provide an address, phone, email and, and in many cases,chat support to connect with potential donors.
  • Google to identify fake charities. If an organization’s name sounds unfamiliar, search for it along with the word “scam” to find out if anyone has written news stories or filed complaints with the Better Business Bureau.

Spotting Contractor and Vendor Fraud

Contractor fraud involves someone posing as a qualified contractor. This person will, for example, contact homeowners after a flood and tell them they can repair wood floors or install carpeting on the cheap. Then, they collect deposits from multiple homeowners under the guise of doing work, but simply take the money and run.

During Hurricane Sandy, which devastated areas of New Jersey, millions of dollars in taxpayer-funded relief money was fraudulently secured. Some homeowners even pulled from savings or retirement accounts in order to pay contractors, thinking their expenses would be reimbursed. Unscrupulous contractors took advantage of these homeowners and were later indicted on federal charges. The problem prompted the Department of Community Affairs for New Jersey to create a website that educates residents about identifying and preventing contractor-related fraud.

Red Flags for spotting and preventing contractor fraud following disaster:Scam Alert on Green Direction Arrow Sign.

  • The contractor wants a large upfront payment. Contractors can ask for a portion of the funds upfront, but be very wary of anyone who asks for more than 30%.
  • Poor Reviews or lack of listing on the Better Business Bureau website. Also, check sites, such as Yelp and Angie’s List.
  • Request payment by cash or check. Use a credit card when putting down a deposit, since most credit card companies offer fraud protection.
  • Rushing you into an agreement. If a contractor is pushy or demanding and/or fails to offer a detailed work plan, then they could be running a scam.
  • Address is out of the area. If the contractor claims to be well-known in the area, make a few hours to follow up on his or her referrals. Many scam artists come into an area from out-of-state to prey on homeowners affected by disasters and then flee the scene.
  • Exceptionally low bids. An overeager contractor with a “too good to be true” quote is a warning sign. Even if a low-bid is legitimate, if the contractor is willing to work at such a deeply discounted rate, he or she could have intentionally or carelessly made mistakes when providing the estimate. Many times, these contractors go back to the homeowner to ask for more money when they run out of funds.Man in jeans with empty pocket

Remember that safety is a daily priority. And one of the items you should be careful to safeguard is your money! A convenient and affordable way to make sure you are prepared for disasters and emergencies of virtually every kind is to subscribe to the Allied Universal Training System by Universal Fire/Life Safety Services, which has been designed to help improve and save lives. For more information about the best system out there, or to subscribe, click here.